Christmas funding boost for churches and chapels

Published: Thursday, December 10, 2020

 

45 churches and chapels around the UK are getting an early Christmas present in the form of much needed funding from the National Churches Trust.

They share in a £483,000 funding allocation from the National Churches Trust.

In 2020 the National Churches Trust has awarded 260 grants totalling £1,723,000, including recommendations on behalf of other funders with £200,000 of the funding provided by the Wolfson Foundation.  This is an increase in grant funding of almost £400,000 compared to 2019, when the Trust made 188 awards  totalling £1,344,474.

Churches being helped with the latest grants include:

Hull Minster, Hull. A £40,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund re-roofing the South Choir Aisle roof at Hull Minster, a Grade I listed church, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England 'At Risk Register'. The church also receives a £10,000 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust. Built around 1285 Hull Minster is one of Hull’s last Grade I listed buildings. Window tracery at Hull Minster were inspired by Louis IX's Sainte Chapelle in Paris and the church itself furnished a model for other major churches in the Perpendicular period.

St Margaret’s church, Paston, Norfolk. A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an accessible toilet and other facilities at St Margaret’s church in Paston, a Grade I listed church famous for its medieval wall paintings, helping it to better serve its community. The church is a fine, largely 14th century thatched building intricately linked to the Paston family, famous for their collection of letters, written between 1422 and 1509.

Church of the Holy Name of Jesus, Manchester. A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the roof at the Grade I listed Church of the Holy Name, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church, a Victorian masterpiece, is leaking so badly it has many buckets on the floor catching water. The church is currently on the Historic England 'At Risk Register'. The church also receives a £10,000 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust.

Broadcaster and journalist Huw Edwards, Vice President of The National Churches Trust, said:

“The UK's historic churches and chapels are a vital part of our national heritage and have done so much to help local people during the COVID-19 lockdown. But to survive, many need to carry out urgent repairs and install modern facilities. The cost of this work is far beyond what most congregations can pay for themselves.”

“So I’m delighted that the National Churches Trust is providing much needed grants to keep churches and chapels in good repair and with up to date facilities, including toilets and kitchens, so that they can remain open and continue to serve local people.”

Wolfson Foundation

£100,000 of the funding has been provided by the Wolfson Foundation.

Paul Ramsbottom, Chief Executive at the Wolfson Foundation, said:

“Churches play a central role in the spiritual life of a community but they are also an integral, much loved, part of our cultural heritage. We are delighted to be working in partnership with the National Churches Trust on this important programme supporting the preservation of these remarkable and wonderful buildings across the UK.”

Grants in 2021

In 2021, grants will continue to be available to fund projects at churches, chapels and meeting houses. Applications can be made by Christian places of worship in the UK that are open for regular worship. From repairing a roof to helping to install an accessible toilet - and many other projects - the National Churches Trust’s grants help keep churches open for worship and community activities and allow them to continue to serve local people and communities. Funding will be supported by The Pilgrim Trust and The Wolfson Foundation.

Full details of the latest grants

Full details of 20 Cornerstone Grants for fabric repairs and the installation of modern facilities  can be found below, listed in alphabetical order of counties. A photo gallery can be viewed at the bottom of this page and on Flickr.

Additional grants to fund a range of church building maintenance, small repair and development projects have been awarded via the National Churches Trust and by the Wolfson Foundation and with the support of the Pilgrim Trust.  View complete list.

CORNERSTONE GRANTS AWARDED

 

 CHESHIRE

St Paul’s church, Widnes, WA8 7QU

Church of England – Diocese of Liverpool

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of a new toilet at St Paul’s church in Widnes and create a space that allows the church to serve its community.

The church

Built in 1884, designed by Henry Shelmerdine as a traditional redbrick building with stained glass windows, a fine font and features in the Chancel. Situated in the civic centre, the church has close links with the history of Widnes, once the leading town for the UK's Chemical Industry. “The Church Extension Scheme” committee was set up in the 1870s to provide extra churches in the Widnes area, to serve the growing population of Church of England worshippers.  At the time the chuches at Farnworth, West Bank and Ditton were looking after 9,000 plus worshippers.

When the population had reached 25,000, the local people were able to the funds, and with help from famous masters of industry, St Paul’s was built as a daughter Church to “old St Mary’s” in West Bank.  It was finished in November 1884 and the famouse tower and clock were added in 1910.

The project will fund the installation of new toilets and a kitchen by building new entrance vestibules. There are currently no facilities at all for community events and the church serves a community which suffers with high deprivation.

CUMBRIA

Our Lady Star of the Sea and St Michael, Workington, CA14 3EP

Roman Catholic - Diocese of Lancashire District -

Grade II

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund urgent masonry repairs to window stonework which will be a first step in a programme of repairs to help take the church of the Heritage At Risk Register.

The church

This soaring Gothic Revival church is a great example of the second wave of the movement. Situated on Banklands, it occupies an extensive site on the south eastern edge of the town centre. Constructed between 1873-76 in local sandstone to replace a Mission Chapel of 1813, it was built by Benedictine monks from St Laurence's Monastery, Ampleforth in spite of sectarian violence. The church is one of Edward Welby Pugin's last church designs and was completed after his death under the direction of his brothers Cuthbert and Peter Paul.

GREATER MANCHESTER 

Church of the Holy Name of Jesus, Manchester, M13 9PG

Diocese of Salford

Roman Catholic

Grade I

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the roof at the Grade I listed Church of the Holy Name, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is leaking so badly it has many buckets on the floor catching water.

The church is currently on the Historic England ‘At Risk Register’.

The church also receives a £10,000 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust.

The church

The church dates from 1871. It is constructed of brick faced externally with coursed sandstone and internally with buff terracotta tiles made locally by Gibbs & Canning. The tower incorporates reinforced concrete within the predominantly stone-faced brick structure. The main body of the church is rib-vaulted with hollow polygonal terracotta blocks, much lighter than stone, which makes the church unusually spacious.

The church is not rectangular. The south side along Ackers Street is at an angle to the church. This angle has been absorbed into the fabric, and a parallelism is restored by gradually increasing the depth of the side of the Strada chapel as it nears the transept: a feature that excited the members of the Architectural Society who visited the church after its opening.

In 1895, Church of the Holy Name of Jesus was the venue for the funeral of Sir Charles Halle. The Halle Orchestra and Choir performed Mozart’s Requiem at the service and after the Bishop had preached, the Orchestra performed the Eroica Symphony.

The Church of the Holy Name of Jesus is owned and served by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and is the church of the Catholic chaplaincy of Manchester’s universities.

HEREFORDSHIRE

St Barnabas church, Brampton Bryan, SY7 0DH

Church of England – Diocese of Hereford

Grade I

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help complete re-roofing repairs at the Grade I listed St Barnabas church in Brampton Bryan, dubbed ‘The Puritans Preaching Box’, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church is currently on the Historic England 'At Risk Register'.

The church also receives a £4,000 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust.

The church

St Barnabas is one of only six churches built or rebuilt during the period of the English Commonwealth. It replaces an earlier building that was destroyed during the siege of Brampton Bryan Castle during the Civil War in 1643. It was commissioned in 1656 by Sir Robert Harley, previously Master of the Mint but who then fell out of favour because he would not sign the deed of execution of Charles I. Sadly the first service held at the church was Harley's funeral. The breadth of the church is all out of proportion to its length. Its nave and chancel are one, all covered by a very fine triple Hammerbeam roof.

The church contains one early 14th century monument to Lady Margaret de Brampton, shown holding her heart in her hands.

LONDON

1. St Stephen’s church, Shepherds Bush, W12 8JJ

Church of England – Diocese of London

Grade II

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the replacement of existing roof with Welsh slates at the Grade II listed church, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church is currently on the Historic England 'At Risk Register.'

The church

The building is the work of renowned architect Anthony Salvin. The church was begun in 1849 and consecrated on 11th April 1850. In 1940, the church was bomb damaged. Part of the spire and accompanying pinnacles were brought down and deemed to be beyond repair. The rest of the spire was removed and replaced by a timber copper-covered fleche. In the same air raid, some of the stained-glass windows were destroyed and others badly damaged. Upon re-opening in 1949, the windows were repaired where possible, and the damaged East window was replaced with a depiction of Christ in Majesty flanked by saints (Goddard & Gibbs,1951).

In 1966, The Shepherds Bush Housing Association was set up by the vicar, the Revd John Asbridge, and for a few years was run from the vestry by volunteers from the parish. St Stephen’s became known as a church that warmly welcomed what became known as the Windrush Generation, and their welcome was reinforced in 1962 by the appointment of Barbadian-born Revd Wilfred Wood to St Stephen's for his first curacy.

2. St Margaret the Queen, Streatham Hill, SW2 3BH

Church of England – Diocese of Southwark

Grade II

A £8,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs at St Margaret the Queen church, a Grade II listed building, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church has been at the forefront of the community response to COVID-19 and is used by the Lambeth Foodbank.

The church

St Margaret the Queen church is a beautiful Grade II listed building, built between 1889 and 1907 in an Early English style with Arts and Crafts influences. The church is of architectural value as an example of a turn of the twentieth century building which forms an integral part of a planned estate. The church uses the same palette of materials as the surrounding houses, which were designed in conjunction with the church by Rowland Plumbe.

It has great artistic value for its reredos, pulpit, lectern, piscina, sedilia, candle standards and richly decorated chancel panelling by ecclesiastical architect William Douglas Caröe 1909, in a mixture of High Victorian Gothic and Arts and Crafts styling. The stained-glass windows contribute to the decorative scheme of the church and are an important part of its liturgy, mostly designed by Horace and Alfred Wilkinson.

NORFOLK

1. St Mary the Virgin, North Tuddenham, NR20 3DH

Church of England – Diocese of Norwich

Grade I

A £30,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund urgent tower repairs at the church of St Mary the Virgin in North Tuddenham, a Grade I listed building, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church is currently on the Historic England At Risk Register.

The church also receives a £10,000 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust.

The church

St Mary's church is a magnificent Grade I listed building consisting of a 14th century tower, nave, chancel, and entrance porch. The entrance porch also contains mosaics of medieval glass obtained from other defunct churches in the area during the late 19th century. Spectacular Victorian wall tiling in the nave, painted stenciled roundels on the chancel walls, motifs up the arches of the tower and nave suggest a mixture of a Byzantine church and a museum of Victoriana.

St Mary’s is one of 100 churches listed by the Church of England for its ‘Treasures’, in this case the fine medieval stained glass in the Perpendicular windows throughout the church and the two medieval rood screens with images of martyred saints. The large east window depicting scenes from Jesus’ life was installed in the 1880s by Revd Robert Barry after the roof of the chancel was raised. The lower section of the tower window also contains medieval glass.

2. St Margaret’s church, Paston, NR28 9TA

Church of England – Diocese of Norwich

Grade I

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an accessible toilet and other facilities at St Margaret’s church in Paston, a Grade I listed church famous for its medieval wall paintings, helping it to better serve its community

The church

St Margaret’s is a fine, largely 14th century thatched church intricately linked to the Paston family, famous for their collection of letters, written between 1422 and 1509.

Inside, the church contains a series of rare and important medieval wall paintings, including a late 14th century wall painting of St Christopher crossing a river with the Christ Child on his shoulder. Towards the altar another painting has been identified as a morality tale showing three hunting kings or noblemen coming upon three skeletons hanging from a tree, showing how everyone ends up. The painting had been unseen probably for centuries until it was discovered by accident in 1922. Then in November 2013, during the repair works, some further medieval wall paintings emerged above the chancel arch which were likely associated with the rood screen of c.1430-60. These included an angel with curly hair swinging a sensor, and symbols of the Passion. These have been assessed by Dr Andrea Kirkham and are later in date than the other paintings, and are very rare if not unique – the symbols are to be found carved in wood or stone but ours are the only representation in a wall painting. St Margaret’s is therefore of local, national and international importance.

NORTHUMBERLAND

St Michael's church, Alnwick, NE66 1LY

Church of England – Diocese of Newcastle

Grade I

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund tower repairs at the Grade I listed Church, making the church watertight and preserving its historic

The church

St Michael’s church has been a place of worship for over 1,000 years. Much of the current building dates back to the 15th century, and replaced earlier Norman and Saxon churches. The church is dedicated to St Michael the Archangel; in earlier times it was dedicated to St Mary as well. A Grade I listed building, it is considered to be one of Northumberland's architectural gems, and is included in Simon Jenkin's "England's Thousand Best Churches" as one of the top churches of England.

The church was largely built in 1464 during the reign of Henry VI, incorporating fragments of an earlier Norman chapel, and restored in 1862-3. It is perpendicular in style and a rare example of church building in Northumberland at a time when conditions allowed little church building in the county.

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE

All Saints church, Eaton,  DN22 0PS

Church of England – Diocese of Southwell

Grade II

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of a kitchen and toilets at All Saints church in Eaton, a Grade II listed building, helping the church to better serve its community.

The church

The church of All Saints, which stands on an elevated sited in the centre of the village of Eaton, was built in 1857-8, replacing an earlier Norman building. The architect George Shaw of Saddleworth was contracted to design a new building in the Decorated Gothic styles of the 13th and 14th centuries. Built of Steetley stone, it consists of a chancel and nave, with vestry, north porch and a bell turret containing one bell. Shaw also provided the stained glass, except for the east window depicting the Transfiguration which is by J R Thompson of Southwark. There are two features older than the building of the current church: a medieval piscina and an 18th century monument in the vestry.

OXFORDSHIRE

St Michael and All Angels church, Clifton Hampden, OX14 3EE

Church of England – Diocese of Oxford

Grade II*

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund a project to recover the stone slate roofs at St Michael and All Angels church, a Grade II* listed building and ‘ an architectural gem’, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The church of St Michael and All Angels has a long history stretching back to Saxon times.  It has a “theatrical quality,” standing on its cliff overlooking the River Thames. It is likely that there was a building on the site of the present church in Saxon times. The first mention of it seems to be in 1146 when Pope Eugenius III confirmed the possessions of Dorchester Abbey. The oldest remaining elements of the present building are the monumental 12th century south aisle pillars. The church was rebuilt by the great Victorian architect George Gilbert Scott in the nineteenth century and is one of his early masterpieces.The screen with St Michael at the top surrounded by his angels is particularly important (a miniature version of those of Hereford Cathedral [now in the Victoria and Albert Museum] and Lichfield Cathedral). The churchyard dates from 1819 and among those buried in it are Sergeant William Dyke, who is said to have fired the first shot at the Battle of Waterloo, and Major John Howard, who led the daring Pegasus Bridge glider raid in the Second World War.

STAFFORDSHIRE

All Saints church, Stoke on Trent, ST1 3HU

Church of England – Diocese of Lichfield

Grade II

A £7,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of a toilet and a refreshment area at the Grade II listed All Saints church in Stoke on Trent helping the church to better serve the local community.

The church

Part-funded by Meakin, a local potter, All Saints church was rebuilt in 1911 on the site of an original mid 19th century church and is a good example of Gerald Horsley's work. There is a lofty main nave and a north aisle that is on the original foundations. This is used as the Lady Chapel and the east window is also from the original building. The church has significant memorials to the First World War including the large east window in the chancel, the triptych on the main altar, and the memorial to the North Staffs Regiment. It also has fine embroidery from the Leek Embroideries Guild and there is an 'external' pulpit.

The church is amongst the largest in the Potteries being a focal point for Joiners Square, a community that had major mining and sanitary ware manufacture until the late 20th century.

TYNE & WEAR

St Luke’s church, Newcastle upon Tyne,NE2 4AH

Church of England – Diocese of Newcastle

Grade II

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of two unisex WCs and other facilities at St Luke’s church, a Grade II listed building, helping it to be better able to serve its community.

The church is currently on the Historic England 'At Risk Register'.

The church

This parish church, designed by Oliver and Leeson dates from 1886 and was completed in 1890. It is constructed from brick with ashlar dressings and a Welsh slate roof with stone gable copings. It has a short nave with south porch; paired transepts; chancel with north vestry and south apsed chapel. There is a fine wood carved pulpit, executed by the same distinguished craftsman as in Newcastle Cathedral, and excellent period stained glass windows presented by local shopkeepers.

YORKSHIRE

1. Doncaster Minster, Doncaster, DN1 1RD

Church of England - Diocese of Sheffield

Grade I listed

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of four toilets and a refreshment area at Doncaster Minster, a Grade I listed church, helping it to better serve its community. The Minster is currently on the Historic England 'At Risk Register'.

The church

Doncaster Minster is the most prominent building in the town and can be seen for miles around in every direction; its significance is recognised in its status as a Grade I listed building. The present building, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott, was completed in 1858 to replace the medieval church that was destroyed by fire in 1853. The distinctive architecture, the impressive Victorian stained-glass windows, the magnificent Schulze Organ and many other features all serve to encourage the visitor to explore and appreciate this gem in the heart of Doncaster.

Awarded Minster status in 2004 by the Bishop of Sheffield, the church serves Doncaster and the surrounding area and provides a cultural asset, an entertainment venue, an educational resource and daily worship for all.

2. Hull Minster, Kingston upon Hull, HU1 1RR

Church of England – Diocese of York

Grade I

A £40,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund re-roofing the South Choir Aisle roof at Hull Minster, a Grade I listed church, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church is currently on the Historic England 'At Risk Register'.

The church also receives a £10,000 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust.

The church

Built around 1285 Hull Minster is one of Hull’s last Grade I listed buildings. The church was built with the close patronage of Edward I, as he developed Kingston upon Hull, an outstanding example of an Edwardian planned town exhibiting Bastide-type features. Window tracery at Hull Minster were inspired by Louis IX's Sainte Chapelle in Paris and the church itself furnished a model for other major churches in the Perpendicular period.

Above all, a remarkably unified structure makes quite extraordinary use of light, that most noteworthy characteristic of the Perpendicular style. Other elements which make Hull Minster unique are; two ‘arts and crafts’ windows designed by the world renowned Walter Crane, the 6th largest organ in the country built in the 18th century, unique hand carved oak pew ends from medieval and Victorian times, Robert ‘Mousey’ Thompson furniture containing his trademark mice, and a beautifully carved coralloid marble font dating back to around 1380, used by the slave abolitionist William Wilberforce.

3.  St Oswald's church, Fulford, YO10 4HJ

Church of England - Diocese of York 

Grade II

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof and rainwater goods repairs at the Grade II listed church of St Oswald in Fulford, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

There has been Christian presence in Fulford from before the Norman Conquest and a church since 1150, but by 1860 it was too small. A new site closer to the village was purchased in 1864 and the new church opened in 1866. The architect was J P Pritchett junior of Darlington. The church was destroyed by fire in 1877 but rebuilt by the generous donations of parishioners and re-opened in 1878. Significant architectural features of the 1866-1878 church are the superb stone carvings, the gold mosaic and the stained-glass windows.

WALES

Our Lady of Peace, Newbridge, Gwent, NP11 4RB

Roman Catholic

Grade II* Church

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to roof at the Grade II* listed church, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The work will include removing bitumen paint and netting installed during World War Two to avoid detection of the church, a prominent navigational aid for German planes, in wartime air raids over south Wales.

The church also receives a £10,000 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust.

The church

The church was designed by architect P. D. Hepworth and was influenced by the work of the great church architect Giles Gilbert Scott. It occupies a prominent position overlooking the Ebbw River. The basilica style church, sanctuary, and two-storey presbytery form a complex of buildings perched on the side of a characteristically steep Welsh valley. The interior is striking for its simplicity - it is rendered and painted white with coloured roof panels. The font is carved from Forest of Dean stone.

Designated by an independent architectural assessment as of ‘outstanding significance’, the church is exceptional, not only through its imposing beauty, but also as one of the few in Wales to display influences of the inter-war movement in continental modernism. Completed shortly before the Second World War, its prominent location led to the exterior being coated in dark bitumen paint and netting to avoid detection in wartime air raids. This camouflage was subsequently painted over in later years and is contributing to present problems – in many ways the building is still fighting the effects of the Second World War.

SCOTLAND

Carntyne Church of Scotland, City of Glasgow, G32 6LW

Church of Scotland

Grade B

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to rainwater goods at Carntyne Church of Scotland church, Grade B listed, making it watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church also receives a £7,500 Wolfson Fabric Repair Grant from the Wolfson Foundation on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust.

The church

Completed in 1932, Carntyne church was designed by James Taylor Thomson in a simplified Romanesque style and constructed using New Cumnock brick, with blonde sandstone ashlar dressings and slate roofs. Internally it is light and spacious with substantial nave and low south aisle, transepts and chancel. Prominently located at the heart of a new interwar community, the church was part of the most prolific religious building programme since the Victorian era.

It is one of a series that were pioneered by the Church of Scotland to serve growing suburban neighbourhoods that provided housing for the overcrowded population of Glasgow. Category B listed, the church has played a significant role in the mission of the Church of Scotland and in the social, cultural and religious life of Carntyne. The church continues to be an important focal point for the congregation and wider community living in the parish.

St Mary's Scottish Episcopal church, Port Glasgow, Inverclyde, PA14 6HB

Scottish Episcopal Church

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof work making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

St Mary’s Episcopal Church in Port Glasgow sits high above the town with commanding views across the Clyde to the Trossachs and Ben Lomond beyond. The original church, founded in 1851 near the Clyde riverbank, alongside a shipyard, was financed with a gift from the daughter of a local Laird, Jane Shaw-Stewart, a nurse who went on to accompany Florence Nightingale to Scutari in the Crimea. St Mary’s has a long history serving the town with its vibrant ship building industry.

In the latter part of the 20th century the demise of the shipyards saw the fortunes of Port Glasgow plummet and with it the onset of deprivation and economic and social decline. The church remained active and served the community throughout this prolonged period of uncertainty and anxiety. The 1851 church was bought and demolished in 1982 to make way for the extension of the A8 road with a new distinctive design building occupying its present site.

NORTHERN IRELAND

Kiltermon Church of Ireland, Fivemiletown, Tyrone, BT75 0LD

Church of Ireland

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the building of an extension, installing a kitchen, toilet and meeting room at Kiltermon chuch helping it to better serve the local community.

The church

Kiltermon church was built in 1841 as a School House and a Chapel of Ease in the parish of Aghalurcher. It was under the care of the Curate of Clogher. The building was constructed using stone sourced from Alderwood Quarry. It became a Chapel of Ease under the Parish of St John's Fivemiletown when The Perpetual Curacy to Clogher was dissolved and Fivemiletown became a parish in its own right. It was extensively renovated after World War II and a new roof was added in the early 1970s.