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Brecon Cathedral

The Cathedral welcomes everyone who passes through, if you are visiting as a tourist, come to offer your personal prayers and light a candle, or interested in history, architecture or stained glass windows.

Brecon, Powys

Opening times

Open 8.30am to 6.30pm.

Address

Cathedral Close
Brecon
Powys
LD3 9DP

Brecon Cathedral started life in 1093 as the Benedictine Priory of St John the Evangelist, built by the Normans on the site of an earlier Celtic church. At the dissolution of the monasteries in 1537 it became Brecon's parish church. It became a Cathedral only in 1923, on the establishment of the Diocese of Swansea and Brecon. 

Although a building of relatively modest proportions, the Cathedral is set in a walled Close, unique in Wales. The remains of the former monastic buildings today provide the administrative centre for the Diocese as well as housing for the Cathedral clergy and a Heritage Centre and Restaurant. This remarkable collection of buildings is the finest of its kind in Wales.


Enjoy a virtual tour here:

  • Spectacular stained glass

  • Social heritage stories

  • National heritage here

  • Magnificent memorials

  • Glorious furnishings

  • Fascinating churchyard

  • Famous connections

  • Enchanting atmosphere

  • Captivating architecture

  • Walkers & cyclists welcome

  • Train station within 250m

  • Space to secure your bike

  • Parking within 250m

  • On street parking at church

  • Non-accessible toilets in church

  • Level access to the main areas

  • Dog friendly

  • Church shop or souvenirs

  • Café within 500m

  • Café in church

  • Bus stop within 100m

  • Accessible toilets nearby

  • Accessible toilets in church

  • Church in Wales

Contact information

Other nearby churches

St Mary the Virgin

Brecon, Powys

St Mary's has occupied this site for over 900 years, although we are uncertain of the date of consecration.

Plough Chapel

Brecon, Powys

The first chapel on this site was a meeting room in a building also used as a pub called The Plough, which stood here in the 17th century.