Holy Trinity

Amberley, Gloucestershire

Address

Holy Trinity
Amberley
Gloucestershire
GL5 5JG

Holy Trinity Church is one of very few remaining churches created with a cast iron internal floor and column structure. The church was built in 1836 in a pre-archaeological Gothic style to the designs of the Cheltenham architect Robert Stokes. The building has an interesting two-tier structure - the upper floor is the church, accessed by the principal flight of steps at the west end, a ramped access on the north side and steps to the choir and clergy vestries at the east end. The lower floor, an under-croft or semi- basement, originally provided two school rooms but is now the Parish Room or village hall; access to the Parish Room is via steps adjacent to the principal church steps. Holy Trinity Church is in a local ecumenical partnership with Amberley Methodist Church, the common place of worship being Holy Trinity Church

This is phase 2 of the project which will see the installation of accessible toilets within the church. This is ahead of plans to alter the church vestibule to accommodate a community shop, post office and café. The proposal is to convert the choir vestry to accommodate two conventional toilets, and a wheelchair accessible unisex toilet, washbasin, and sink. In order to gain access from the body of the church, part of the clergy vestry will be partitioned off, creating a passage from the nave through to the current choir vestry; new drainage will be required to replace existing historic systems. 

  • Church of England

  • Cornerstone Grant, £5,000, 2021

  • Our Cornerstone Grants fund urgent repairs and essential community facilities such as toilets and kitchens to help keep churches open.

Contact information

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