Partnership grants for local churches

Published: Friday, March 27, 2015

 

The National Churches Trust works in partnership with 26 local churches trusts to provide grants towards repair projects.

Applying local knowledge and expertise we give grants of £2,500 to £10,000 for urgent repair projects with estimated costs of between £10,000 and £100,000 (including VAT and fees).

We aim to make a significant difference to places of worship through supporting urgent repair projects. Applications can be made by visiting our Partnership Grants page.

Below we list Partnership Grants awarded in 2014.

Cambridgeshire

  • St Kyneburgha’s Church, Castor, Cambridgeshire, PE5 7AY

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

An ancient building regarded amongst the top 100 churches in England, St Kyneburgha’s was sacked by the Vikings, restored by the Saxons, and rebuilt by the Normans. It boasts many exceptional features including Roman, Saxon and Norman stonework, the finest Romanesque Norman tower in England, a beautiful nave roof with 60 angels and other figures, Saxon carvings, medieval wall paintings, and the medieval Lady Chapel stone altar. The project aims to carry out urgent repairs to the Collyweston slate and lead roofs of the South transept.

Cornwall

  • Riverside United Church, West Looe, Cornwall, PL13 2BU

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Unlisted (Methodist)

A former Congregational Chapel, Riverside United Church is the only non conformist chapel in Looe still operating as a church. Set on the quayside, it is a handsome 19th century building on steeply stoping ground. The project aims to undertake urgent repairs to the roof, which is in a very poor state of repair and in urgent need of remedial work.

Derbyshire

  • St George and St Mary’s Church, Church Gresley

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

First recorded in the Doomsday book in 1363, St George and St Mary’s Church was built in the early 12th century as the conventual church of the nearby Gresley Priory. Most of the original 12th century exterior was replaced during a rebuild in 1820, but the interior remains in the original medieval gothic style. The chancel was designed by A.W. Blomfield and built in 1872. The project aims to carry out repairs to the structure and stonework

Dorset

  • St Mary the Virgin Church, Charminster, Dorset, DT2 9RD

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

Situated at the heart of the village of Charminster, St Mary the Virgin church is a striking medieval church which boasts many of its original 11th century features, thanks to a sympathetic Victorian restoration in the 1890s. It has a beautiful churchyard, bordered by the river Cerne. that enhance the building and enable it to be well used.The project aims to undertake urgent repairs to the stonework and flooring, which suffered badly from last year’s winter flooding. The pillars and walls will be repaired and protected for the future, and the ruined wood block flooring will be replaced with a stone floor, with under floor heating.

  • St Mary the Virgin, Marshwood, Dorset, DT6 5QA

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

A Victorian church rebuilt in 1884 by G Vialls, St Mary the Virgin Church boasts fine chancel pews and red wall lamps designed by Thomas Hardy. The church works closely with the local school next door, who use it daily and help out with some of the church’s bills. The project aims to carry out urgent repairs to the windows, which are leaking badly, and the surrounding stonework, which has been worn away by metal rods holding the windows in place.

  • St Simon and St Jude, Milton-on-Stour, Dorset, SP8 5QD

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II Listed (Church of England)

Built in 1868 to a design by Slater & Carpenter, St Simon and St Jude’s Church has excellent proportions, and its Victorian west tower, with its broach spire, is a local landmark. The project aims to undertake rewiring and renewing the foundations.

  •  St Nicholas, Silton, Dorset, SP8 5PR

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

One of the most beautiful churches in Dorset, St Nicholas’ is a medieval wonder full of exceptional features, including a 12th century Romanesque arcade, and a north chapel with an embattled parapet, string course with gargoyles, and stone fan-vault ceiling with carved angel corbels. The project aims to carry out repairs to the stonework of the Chancel East Gable, North East vestry, Chancel gable and North nave, as well as to repair the boiler house steps and remove asbestos from the boiler room.

Greater Manchester

  • St John the Divine Church, Pemberton, Wigan, Greater Manchester, WN5 0DT

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II Listed (Church of England)

Built from 1830-1832 to a design by Thomas Rickman and Henry Hutchinson, St John’s Church is a fine example of the Gothic Revival style and forms an important part of the local street scene. The project aims to carry out urgent roof repairs, following several thefts of the church’s lead. The new roof will be laid with terne-coated stainless steel to deter further theft.

Herefordshire

  • St Peter’s Church, Pipe Cum Lyde, Herefordshire, HR4 8AD

£10,000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

Built on the probable site of a Bronze Age Burial Ground, St Peter’s is a fine Norman church dating back to 1100 AD. It retains much of its original 12th and 13th century structures and features, including the nave, south doorway, tower and chancel.  The project aims to carry out repairs to the stonework of the spire and porch.

Isle of Wight

  • St John the Evangelist Church, Sandown, Isle of Wight, PO36 8BL

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II Listed (Church of England)

Built in 1880 to 1881 by the architect Luck, St John the Evangelist is a dramatic building, and indeed one of the largest in the seaside town of Sandown. The Church boasts the St Nicholas’s Chapel, a Lady Chapel, and a choir vestry and clergy vestry off the chancel.The project aims to carry out urgent repairs to the roof and gutters.

Kent

  • St George’s Church, Gravesend, Kent, DA11 0DJ

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

An historic Georgian church built in 1732, St George’s boasts many original furnishings including ‘barley Stick’ altar rails and altar table, and many fine later additions, including an exceptional reredos by Clayton & Bell, and the small paintings attached to the altar rails: painted by Mrs Fletcher of Bycliffe in 1893, they were copied from those painted by Fra Angelico at Florence. The project aims to carry out urgent repairs to the cement render on the parapet on the south side, and to the stonework and gutters.

  • St Michael’s Church, Sittingbourne, Kent, ME10 4PG

£7500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

A fine 11th century church with impressive surviving medieval fabric, St Michael’s Church survived a serious fire in 1762 and retains many architectural details of interest including carved stone heads, a 15th century font and tomb, and fine stained glass (particularly the Victorian east window of the Last Supper and a memorial window to the First World War in the south transept). The project aims to carry out urgent repairs to the roof, gutters and stonework.

Leicestershire

  • St Mary’s Church, Barkby, Leicestershire, LE7 3QG

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

A late 13th century church featuring some fine Victorian restoration work, St Peter’s is a striking ironstone church in the Perpendicular Gothic style. The project aims to carry out repairs to the roof, stonework, windows, and broken boiler house pump, which has been broken and risks damaging the Church’s stone foundations.

  • St Bartholomew's Church, Kirby Muxloe, Leicestershire, LE9 2AL

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

St Bartholomew’s is a small medieval church in white sandstone, boasting fine Victorian furnishings and internal decoration dating to the restoration of 1848-50. The project aims to carry out repairs to the gutters and rainwater goods, and to dry, treat, re-point, re-plaster and re-decorate the walls.

  • St Michael and All Angels Church, Thurmaston, Leicestershire, LE4 8DR

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

Dating back to Saxon times, all but the surviving 13th century Nave pillars and arches and the 15th century tower of St Michael and All Angels Church was completely rebuilt in 1848-49 by the architect Henry Stevens of Derby, whose design included an entirely unique roof: a heavily timbered hammer-beam design roof covering the centre nave and Aisles in a single span. The project aims to carry out urgent external re-pointing of windows to prevent further deterioration, re-pointing of buttresses and other stonework, glazing repairs to east window, minor repairs to coping stones and roof slates, repair to tower louvres.

Northamptonshire

  • Holy Trinity Church, Hinton-in-the-Hedges, Northamptonshire, NN13 5NE

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

A charming 12th century church on Saxon foundations, Holy Trinity Church boasts many interesting features including its original rood screen and staircase to its loft, two 13th century effigies to Sir William Hinton and his wife, and many fine memorial plaques. The project aims to carry out repairs to the windows.

  • St Nicholas’ Church, Marston Trussell, Northamptonshire, LE16 9TY

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

St Nicholas’ Church was originally built in 13th century from local sandstone and recycled parts of a nearby ruined castle, of which only the moat and mound can now be seen. The porch is believed to have been made from the oak of a Danish Ship. St Nicholas’ played a key role in the English Civil War: when King Charles I's Cavaliers made their last stand against Cromwell's men and were defeated at the Battle of Naseby, those who fled were cornered at 'Pudding Poke Marston', slaughtered and buried near the churchyard. The project aims to carry out repairs to the roof, including replacing a rotten lintel beam, and undertake extensive redecoration following damage as a result of water ingress after lead thefts.

Nottinghamshire

  • St Michael the Archangel Church, Laxton, Nottinghamshire, NG22 0NX

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

One of the finest and largest churches in Nottinghamshire in the Middle Ages, St Michael the Archangel Church dates from the 12th century, with its chancel added in the 14th century and its clerestory in the 15th century. In the 1850s the church underwent a major restoration programme, and today is an impressive building encircled by the only surviving open fields in its village. The project aims to carry out essential roof repairs – including repairing the Nave roof timbers and re-covering a section with Welsh slate – and to replace the lead gutters.

Oxfordshire

  • St Mary’s Church, Buckland, Oxfordshire, SN7 8RL

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

 A beautiful 12th century building with a 13th century chancel, tower and transepts, St Mary’s Church boasts a rare matching pair of Norman arches, 14th-century octagonal font, late 12th century Crusader Chest, manorial box pews, and the magnificent Barcote Chapel, famed for its decorative Victorian mosaic and glass work. The chancel holds a triangular locker containing the heart-burial (1575) of William Holcott of Barcote Manor, a staunch Protestant who only just avoided being burnt at the stake by Mary Tudor. The project aims to carry out urgent roof repairs to protect these treasures.

  • St Mary’s Church, Longworth, Oxfordshire, OX13 5DY

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade I Listed (Church of England)

A robust village church set in a vibrant village community, St Mary’s dates from the 13th century and is well sited on the Golden Ridge, with beautiful views across the upper Thames towards the Cotswolds. Inside, it boasts a Jacobean chancel screen said to have been a gift by Archbishop Laud, possibly when he was Chancellor of Oxford, and fine monuments and brasses. The church has a literary connection as a son of the former rector was Richard Doddridge Blackmore otherwise known as R.D. Blackmore, the author of the novel Lorna Doone. The project aims to carry out urgent roof repairs.

Somerset

  • Oldfield Park Baptist Church, Bath, Somerset, BA2 3JD

£3000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II Listed (Baptist Church)

Built in the early Edwardian period, Oldfield Park Baptist Church is an attractive building in the Georgian architectural style, built of ashlar stone from the local Bath quarries. The project aims to carry out repairs to the windows, to reduce water ingress and damage to the stone surrounds.

  • St Mary Magdalene Church, Clatworthy, Somerset, TA4 2EQ

£2000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

St Mary Magdalene Church was largely rebuilt in the Victorian period, but retains its original 12th century tower. Its nave boasts a 19th century barrel-vaulted wooden ceiling and its south porch a wagon roof, both decoratd with fine gold-painted bosses, and the rare quality of still being lit by oil lamps and candles. The project aims to carry out urgent repairs to the gutters and the roof, to improve ventilation, reduce water ingress and eradicate Death Watch Beetle, which has been attacking the roof timbers, particularly those that are damp due to water ingress where the western truss abuts the tower masonry and the western wall plates.

  • St Peter and St John Church, Moorland

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II Listed (Church of England)

A Victorian church built in the Perpendicular style in 1844 by Benjamin Ferrey, St Peter and St John’s Church is at the centre of its village, and during the devastating floods that hit Somerset during the winter of 2013 it took on a central role as the village became cut-off, and then being inundated itself became a reminder of the importance of 'community' within a rural parish. The project aims to undertake repairs to the windows, to reduce water ingress and repair damage to the stone surrounds inflicted during the 2013 winter floods, when 18 inches of water ruined floors, pews, organ, tombs and walling, inside, and forced the church to closed for over 3 months.

  • Somerton Methodist Church, Somerton, Somerset, TA11 7PR

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II Listed (Methodist)

Built on the site of former pub ‘The Nags Head’ in 1845, Somerton Methodist Church’s first minister was Thomas Connock, appointed directly by John Wesley. A rectangular building plan, the front gable has two fine perpendicular-type windows either side of an arched door. The project aims to carry out essential repairs for reasons of health and safety, including to the timber suspended floor, with associated repairs to the timber screen above.

Surrey

  • Elstead United Reformed Church, Elstead, Surrey, GU8 6HP

£2500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II Listed (United Reformed Church)

Built in 1845 by Mr Dixon, an architect from Goldalming, at a cost of £395, Elstead United Reformed Church is an early Victorian Church in the Classic Style. It is in coursed Bargate stone rubble with white brick dressings to the front, red brick dressings to the side and a state roof. The project aims to carry out urgent roof repairs to the windows and doors.

Warwickshire

  • St Peter’s Church, Dunchurch, Warwickshire, CV22 6PE

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* Listed (Church of England)

Dating from the 9th century and largely the work of the monks of Pipewell, a Cistercian monastery in Northamptonshire, St Peter’s was substantially rebuilt in the 13th and 14th centuries and retains many of ancient features, including a Norman font, early pillar bases, and several stone piscinas. The project aims to carry out internal repairs to several areas of defective plastering and the floor tiling to the tower entrance.

Scotland

  • Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Dunoon, Argyll and Bute, Scotland, PA23 7LN

£5000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* (B) Listed (Scottish Episcopal Church)

 A pretty Gothic Revival church built in 1850 and enlarged at the end of the century, Holy Trinity sits in a setting of great beauty, looking out over the town to the Clyde estuary, surrounded by the woodland of ‘Bishops Glen’. Designed by John Henderson, it has many fine features, including an ornate stone altar and font, vaulted chancel and framed nave ceilings, significant ‘Minton’ encaustic tiles in the sanctuary, and Mayer east windows. Electric lighting was partly paid for and installed, for Christmas Day 1944, by the naval personnel serving at HMS Curlew, the Clyde submarine defence establishment in Innellan. The graveyard features a monument to Alexander Reid, a notable figure in Scottish art history and also one for Sir Francis Powell, Scottish Watercolourist.The project aims to carry out urgent roof repairs.

  • Craiglockhart Parish Church, Edinburgh, Scotland, EH14 1HS

£1500 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* (B) Listed (Church of Scotland)

A handsome landmark church in the Edinburgh suburbs, Craiglockhart Parish Church was designed by Hay & Henderson in 1889 and is an elaborate 'Decorated' Gothic Revival style. The project aims to carry out urgent repairs to the elaborate stonework, which is badly affected by the church’s exposed location on the side of a hill.

  • Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Pitlochry,

£1000 National Churches Trust Partnership Grant

Grade II* (B) Listed (Scottish Episcopal Church)

Built in 1858 by architect C Buckeridge of Oxford and extended 1890, Holy Trinity Church boasts many fine features including an organ by Hele, reredos by Sir Ninian Comper, and stained glass windows by various artists including E Kempe, Clayton & Bell, A Ballantine & Son, John Hardman & Co and Alexander L Russell. It also has an attractive lychgate built about 1925. This project aims to undertake specialist repairs to two bellying lancet windows, which need to be removed, re-leaded and reinstalled.