Our latest grants help 34 churches and chapels

Published: Wednesday, April 10, 2019

 

Nine of the churches being helped are on the Historic England ‘Heritage at Risk Register’.

The churches and chapels are sharing in a £323,687 funding payout.

The grants are the first to be made in 2019 by the National Churches Trust.

In 2018 the National Churches Trust awarded grants of £1.2 million to help 202 projects at churches and chapels around the UK.  Demand for funding from the National Churches Trust continues to grow, with a 23% increase in applications since 2017.

The Trust funds churches of all Christian denominations throughout the UK. Applications for grants can be made online 

Our work is made possible by the generosity of our Friends and supporters, including Trusts and Foundations. Why not help  us to save more churches by making a donation or by becoming a Friend.

Broadcaster and journalist Huw Edwards, Vice President of The National Churches Trust, said: “The UK's historic churches and chapels are a vital part of our national heritage. But to survive, many need to carry out urgent repairs and install modern facilities. The cost of this work is far beyond what most congregations can pay for themselves.”

“So I’m delighted that the National Churches Trust, thanks to the generosity of its Friends and supporters, is able to help secure the future of 34 beautiful and historic buildings, all of which play such an important role in the life of local communities.”

Full details of the 20 Cornerstone Grants awarded can be found below. In addition 14 Gateway and Foundation Grants were awarded to fund a range of church building maintenance and development projects.

Churches being helped include:

  • St John the Evangelist, Taunton

Grade I Listed - On the Historic England ‘Heritage at Risk’ Register

 A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund an internal porch to house a disabled toilet and a servery helping the church to better serve its local community. The improvements will help to remove the building from Historic England’s ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

The church of St John the Evangelist, Taunton was built to serve Tangier, a poor district on the west side of the town. Costing £12,000 the church was consecrated in 1863, having been built by the renowned architect Sir George Gilbert Scott (1811 - 1878). Sir Gilbert Scott's other buildings include the Natural History Museum, Albert Memorial, Houses of Parliament, and Keble College, Oxford. St John’s is an extraordinarily imposing example of his work from the peak of his career, and is listed Grade I.

 

  • St Bartholomew, Moreton Corbet

Grade I Listed – On the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

 A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund a project for the installation of a kitchen and toilet, as well as repairs to the stonework of the tower and a replacement for the tower roof at the Grade I listed St Bartholomew church, Moreton Corbet, helping the church to better serve its local community. The work will help to remove the building from Historic England’s ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

St Bartholomew’s church, a Grade I listed building, forms part of a group of nationally important buildings at Moreton Corbet in Shropshire. Adjacent to the church is Moreton Corbet Castle, with its impressive ruins of Elizabethan state apartments.

  • St Mary, Brighstone, Isle of Wight

Grade I Listed

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs and repairs to rainwater goods at the Grade I listed St Mary's church, Brighstone, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

Dating back to the 12th century St Mary's is a Grade I listed building rich in history, boasting four impressive Norman arches. Most of the west end of the church, including the base of the tower, was built in the 14th and 15th centuries of locally quarried Island Stone.

There are memorials in the church to three former rectors who went on to become Bishops.

Thomas Ken, a famous hymn writer (Awake My Soul); Samuel Wilberforce, son of William Wilberforce, the anti-slavery reformer and George Moberly, the first Bishop to hold a Diocesan Synod.  William Fox, the famous pioneering palaeontologist, was curate at Brighstone.

FULL LIST OF CORNERSTONE GRANTS AWARDED

ENGLAND

Cambridgeshire               

St Mary and the Holy Host of Heaven, Cheveley, Newmarket CB8 9DG

Church of England - Diocese of Ely

Grade I Listed

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an extension with an accessible toilet and a modern kitchenette at the Grade I listed St Mary and the Holy Host of Heaven church, Cheveley, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

The dedication of the church to St Mary and The Holy Host of Heaven is believed to be unique. The Grade I listed church was built in the 13th century.

Unusually it has a cruciform shape design (shaped like a cross). Such cruciform plans are more often seen in great cathedrals, for example Ely, rather than in a parish church.

The project

The project will support the external extension of the south transept to allow for the installation of an accessible toilet and baby changing facilities. In addition a small lobby with overhead storage and level access from within the church will be added and a modern kitchenette built in the south transept.

Derbyshire

St Mary's, Chaddesden, Derbyshire DE21 6LS

Church of England - Diocese of Derby

Grade I Listed - On the Historic England ‘Heritage at Risk’ Register

 A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the replacement of the slate roofs and repair the lead on the tower roof at the Grade I listed St Mary's church, Chaddesden. The work will make the church watertight and preserve its historic fabric, helping remove the building from Historic England’s ‘Heritage at Risk’ Register.

The church

Grade I listed St Mary's has been the parish church of Chaddesden since at least 1347 AD. The chancel of the present building dates from that period, with the nave, aisles and tower being later additions.

In the Victorian era the church building was refurbished, with alterations to the height and pitch of the roof. In the Edwardian era, there was further work with additional wood panelling and a reredos added to the chancel.

The project

The project will focus on replacing the roof slates over the aisles and the nave and repairing the lead on the tower roof. It includes improving the rainwater goods to protect the new roofs.

Essex

St John the Baptist, Mount Bures CO8 5AR

Church of England - Diocese of Chelmsford

Grade I Listed

An £8,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund an extension to the north side for the Grade I listed St John the Baptist church, Mount Bures to install a servery and toilet, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

The Church of St John the Baptist, Mount Bures is a beautiful Grade I listed  building, which has been serving the Essex village since the 12th century.

The dedication to St John probably stems from the church’s proximity to the River Stour. Parts of the 800 year-old building feature bricks fired by the Romans.

Outside, the churchyard features a Conservation Area, which is attractive to small animals and butterflies. Parts of it are left unmown during the summer and autumn months to allow certain rare flowers to thrive, including harebells.

The project

The project will allow for a small extension to be built, re-opening a mediaeval doorway to the north side of the church. A fully-accessible toilet and a servery will be installed in the church.

Gloucestershire

St John the Baptist, Pitchcombe, Stroud GL6 6LW

Church of England - Diocese of Gloucester

Grade II Listed

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the replacement of roof tiles and rectify defective stonework at the Grade II listed St John the Baptist church, Pitchcombe, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

St John the Baptist serves as an important part of village life, with its thriving and cohesive community, all the more so since the village has lost its school, shop and pubs.

St John the Baptist is a Grade II listed church built in 1819. The chancel and south porch were added in 1867. It stands on the site of a medieval church, known as the Pitchcombe Cradle.

St John’s retains four large stone tablets dating from the 17th century, showing the Creed, the Lord's Prayer and the Ten Commandments.  The church is situated in the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and overlooks the beautiful Painswick Valley.

The project

Over the 200 years since the present building was constructed there are known to have been several projects to repair the roof slopes. However, most of the natural Cotswold stone roof tiles, some of which probably date back to the original roof, have now eroded to the point at which they need to be replaced. The project will support the work to repair the roof and rectify defective stonework.

Isle of Wight

St Andrew's, Chale PO38 2HF

Church of England - Diocese of Portsmouth

Grade II* Listed

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of toilet facilities and a new kitchen at the Grade II* listed St Andrew's church, Chale, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

The Bishop of Winchester dedicated St Andrew’s, Chale, in 1114. The building is largely medieval with Victorian extensions.

There are many interesting memorials in the church including one dedicated to members of 40 Marine Commando and the crew of HMS Fidelity, who trained in Chale during World War II.

The crew included First Officer WRNS Madeline Barclay, possibly the only woman to die while serving aboard a Royal Navy ship during the war, all of whom died when Fidelity was torpedoed off the Azores in 1942.

The project

The project will help toilet facilities with disabled access in the former north porch. In addition, a kitchen will be fitted to the west wall.

 

St Mary's, Brighstone PO30 4AQ

Church of England - Diocese of Portsmouth

Grade I Listed

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs and repairs to rainwater goods at the Grade I listed St Mary's church, Brighstone, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Dating back to the 12th century St Mary's is a Grade I listed building rich in history, boasting four impressive Norman arches. Most of the west end of the church, including the base of the tower, was built in the 14th and 15th centuries of locally quarried Island Stone.

The church served as a centre of defence for the village against French invasions. Parish records cite "arrows" and "pikes" being stored in the church and in 1543 a brass gun housed in a gun house.

There are memorials in the church to three former rectors who went on to become Bishops.

Thomas Ken, a famous hymn writer (Awake My Soul); Samuel Wilberforce, son of William Wilberforce, the anti-slavery reformer and George Moberly, the first Bishop to hold a Diocesan Synod.  William Fox, the famous pioneering palaeontologist, was curate at Brighstone.

St Mary's has strong connections with the sea. Many of the church’s roof timbers were taken from local shipwrecks. In the churchyard, gravestones tell the stories of men who rescued people from shipwrecks and sadly includes the memorials to three small children who drowned picking winkles on the beach.

The project

The project will address the very poor condition of three areas of the church roof, caused by continual weathering over many decades, focusing on repairs to the roof and water drainage systems.

Lancashire

All Saints', Burnley BB12 6PA

Church of England - Diocese of Blackburn

Grade II Listed

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the tower and spire at the Grade II listed All Saints' with St Johns West Burnley, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The church was built in the mid-19th century and was paid for by two local noble families. The Shuttleworth family of Gawthorpe Hall gave the land, and the Dugdale family,  who were the local mill owners of Lower House, gave the money. Despite this rather 'well to do' patronage, the church's first vicar, Mr Verity, was a great supporter of the development of trade unionism and had a real commitment to the poor.

The project

The project will focus on repairs to the tower, spire and internal fabric of the church, which is suffering from extensive water ingress, with water cascading down the interior of the tower into the rooms below. The project will repair the damage to the masonry which is affecting the stability of the spire and to replace structural timbers.

Lincolnshire

St Helen's, Stickford, Boston PE22 8EP

Church of England - Diocese of Lincoln

Grade II* Listed

A £13,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund install a water supply, toilet and servery at the Grade II* listed St Helen's church, Stickford, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

St Helen’s church, Stickford, Lincolnshire is a Grade II* building which dates back to the 13th century. The north arcade and part of the north aisle survive from this time, with a 14th century south arcade. Medieval pew ends featuring carved poppy heads are of particular interest, some of which have recently undergone conservation treatment at Lincoln University. These are on display in the north aisle.

The project

Currently the church has no running water, so the project will support plans to install a water supply, toilet and servery thus enabling the church to hold more community events.

St Peter and St Lawrence, Wickenby LN3 5AB

Church of England - Diocese of Lincoln

Grade II* Listed

A £14,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund the installation of a kitchen and toilet at the Grade II* listed St Peter and St Lawrence church, Wickenby, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

The parish church of St Peter and St Lawrence is mentioned in the Domesday Book and has been at the centre of the rural community ever since.

The Grade II* building dates mainly from the 13th century, but features a font which is believed to be of Saxon origin.

The church contains some fine stained glass and monuments, including early 14th century stained glass depicting three medieval family shields including that of the influential Percy family.

The project

St Peter and St Lawrence is the only public building where people can gather in this isolated rural community. The church is used for some community activities, but these are limited by the lack of kitchen and toilet facilities in the building. Consequently the project will support the installation of a kitchen in the base of the tower, and a toilet.

North Yorkshire

All Saints', Newton on Ouse YO30 2BN

Church of England - Diocese of York

Grade II Listed - On the Historic England ‘Heritage at Risk’ Register

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help complete urgent repairs to the roof at the Grade II listed All Saints' church, Newton on Ouse, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric which will help remove the building from Historic England’s ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

The church

There has been a church in Newton on Ouse since Saxon times.

The present church features a spire built on top of the very much older tower, which is the only remaining part of the church built 900 years ago.

The current Grade II listed building dates from 1849 and was commissioned by the Hon. Lydia Dawnay in 1848. The York architect, George Townsend Andrews, prepared the designs. Andrews had already made his name as architect to the Railway King, George Hudson, for whom he built many of the larger North Eastern Railway Stations.

The project

The project will support urgent repairs to the north aisle roof. In addition, repairs will be made to the upper stonework and re-leading windows in the building.

Northamptonshire

St Peter & St Paul, Watford Village NN6 7UR

Church of England - Diocese of Peterborough

Grade I Listed – On the Historic England  ‘Heritage at Risk’ Register.

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the nave and chancel roofs at the Grade I listed St Peter & St Paul's church, Watford Village. The work will make the church watertight and preserve its historic fabric, thus helping to remove the building from Historic England’s ‘Heritage at Risk’ Register.

The church

Built around 1300, St Peter and St Paul’s church is a Grade I listed building. For centuries this was an estate church to a succession of noble families. The Victorians re-ordered the church in the mid 19th century, but retained the fixed nave box pews, one of the church’s distinguishing features.

The project

Following lead theft from the nave roof in May 2016, and a similar theft from the chancel roof in June 2018, both now have a temporary roof covering and are leaking badly. The funding from the National Churches Trust will assist with the repair and replacement of the nave and chancel roofs.

Shropshire

St Bartholomew, Moreton Corbet, Shawbury SY4 4DW

Church of England - Diocese of Lichfield

Grade I Listed – On the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

 A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund a project for the installation of a kitchen and toilet, as well as repairs to the stonework of the tower and a replacement for the tower roof at the Grade I listed St Bartholomew church, Moreton Corbet, helping the church to better serve its local community. The work will help to remove the building from Historic England’s ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

The church

St Bartholomew’s, a Grade I listed building, forms part of a group of nationally important buildings at Moreton Corbet in Shropshire. Adjacent to the church is Moreton Corbet Castle, with its impressive ruins of Elizabethan state apartments.

The church offers visitors an insight into the history of the Corbet family who built the castle. Thomas Farnolls Pritchard, the architect of Ironbridge and Coalbrookdale, recognised as the birthplace of the Industrial revolution, carried out work here.

Inside the church, the nave and chancel originated in the late Norman period. The south aisle is a memorial chapel to the Corbet family and was constructed in the mid-14th century.

The project

The project will support work to install a new kitchen and toilet, together with a water supply. There will also be repairs to the stonework of the tower and a replacement for the tower roof.

Somerset

St John the Evangelist, Taunton TA1 4DG

Church of England - Diocese of Bath & Wells

Grade I Listed - On the Historic England ‘Heritage at Risk’ Register

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund an internal porch to house a disabled toilet and a servery at the Grade I listed St John the Evangelist church, Taunton, helping the church to better serve its local community. The improvements will help to remove the building from Historic England’s ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

The church

The church of St John the Evangelist, Taunton was built to serve Tangier, a poor district on the west side of the town. Costing £12,000 the church was consecrated in 1863, having been built by the renowned architect Sir George Gilbert Scott (1811 - 1878) who began practice in the late 1830s and became the most successful architect of his day.

Sir Gilbert Scott's other buildings include the Natural History Museum, Albert Memorial, Houses of Parliament, and Keble College, Oxford. St John’s is an extraordinary imposing example of his work from the peak of his career, and is listed Grade I.

The project

The project involves the installation of an internal porch at the west end of the church, housing a disabled toilet and flower arranging facilities to one side of the main entrance and a servery on the other side.

St Stephen, Charlton Musgrove, Wincanton BA9 8ES

Church of England - Diocese of Bath and Wells

Grade II* Listed – On the Historic England ‘ Heritage at Risk’ Register

A £17,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the roof at the Grade II* listed St Stephen's church, Charlton Musgrove, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Work began on the church in the 13th century. St Stephen’s features an impressive collection of gargoyles.

The project

This project will support repairs to the roof which are urgently needed, and will in turn help to remove the building from Historic England’s Heritage At Risk Register, on which it is listed at Category D (slow decay).

Suffolk

All Saints', Drinkstone, Bury St Edmunds IP30 9SX

Church of England - Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich

Grade II* Listed

A £24,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help remove, restore and conserve the windows and repair deteriorated stonework at the Grade II* listed All Saints' church, Drinkstone, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

All Saints’ has served as a village church since the 14th century and was built on the site of a Saxon church recorded in the Little Domesday Book. The church has some finely carved pews featuring iconic animals and figures and a notable Victorian stained glass east window.

In the 18th century, the painter Gainsborough was summoned to paint a portrait of a rich local businessman, Joshua Grigsby, who had built for himself a grand house at Drinkstone Park.

The project

The project will help fund the conservation of a number of windows and at the same time to repair and conserve their deteriorated stonework.

St John the Evangelist, Bury St Edmunds IP33 1SN

Church of England - Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich

Grade II* Listed

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof and rainwater goods repairs at the Grade II* listed St John the Evangelist church, Bury St Edmunds, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Consecrated in 1841, St John’s was originally built to serve the area of artisan dwellings created as the town of Bury St Edmunds spread northwards during the early Victorian period. The church was designed by William Ranger and is one of his most important ecclesiastical building designs.

The project

The project will address roof and rainwater goods repairs, as well as some high level stonework repairs and roof insulation work.

Warwickshire

All Saints', Burton Dassett, Nr Southam CV47 2AB

Church of England - Diocese of Coventry

Grade I Listed

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of a servery at the Grade I listed All Saints' church, Burton Dassett, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

All Saints' is a Grade I listed church dating from the early 13th century. Additions were made in the following two centuries. Inside, the church rises steeply from west to east in seven stages and features some important exposed wall paintings.

The project

All Saints is a very popular venue and is used regularly for concerts, weddings, christenings, funerals and a variety of church, social and community events.

The project plans to install a servery at the west end of the church. Outside, toilet facilities are planned for a second phase making the church more welcoming to visitors and worshippers alike.

Worcestershire

St Faith, Overbury, Tewkesbury GL20 7NY

Church of England - Diocese of Worcester

Grade I Listed

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of a toilet and refreshment area at the Grade I listed St Faith's church, Overbury, helping the building to better serve its local community.

The church

Situated in the Cotswold Area of Outstanding Beauty, St Faith’s, a Grade I listed building can seat up to 200 people.

Parts of the building date from the 11th Century. In 1040, a massive double row of stone columns was erected. The Normans also installed a font with carved stone panels. In the 14th Century, the north and south aisles were added, the nave roof was raised and the south doorway, with Norman mouldings and arch, moved to its present position.

The project

The project will support the installation of a universally accessible toilet in the northwest corner of the church cleverly sited within a reconfigured vestry. The refreshment area will be situated within the North aisle pews, with the sink unit and servery skilfully created from old pews.

NORTHERN IRELAND

Londonderry

Aghadowey Presbyterian Church, Aghadowey, Coleraine BT51 4DR

Grade B2

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs at the Grade B2 listed Aghadowey Presbyterian Church, Coleraine making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Built 1830, the Aghadowey Presbyterian Church was orginally built to accommodate a sizable congregation made up of linen mill workers who lived and worked close by. The church has two storeys with a high gallery round three sides focusing on the pulpit. Last year the congregation celebrated the 300th Anniversary of the migration from Co.Londonderry to New Hampshire.

The project

The project will address roof repairs which were first identified as urgent in 2016. The work involves stripping the existing slates and slating laths, repair to the timbers where moisture ingress has caused decay and repairs to guttering and downpipes.

County Down

St Philip and St James, Holywood BT18 9BX

Grade B+

A £14,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund tower and spire repairs at the Grade B+ listed St Philip and St James church, Holywood, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

St Philip and St James began life in 1842 as a church built to replace an old priory building. It was then tripled in size and can now accommodate 500 worshippers.

The architect for the church was Mr (later Sir) Charles Lanyon who also designed the main building at Queen's University in Belfast, later named the Lanyon Building.

The project

The project will address urgently needed repairs to the tower and spire. The spire is noticeably leaning due to the corrosion of iron cramps. The balustrade to the base of the spire is subject to a marine environment and in a desperate state. Gutters and downpipes are in the process of being repaired.