King Richard III’s birthplace church shares in £750,000 heritage funding payout

Published: Monday, November 2, 2015

 

King Richard III’s birthplace church is among 14 churches in 11 English counties sharing in a £750,000 funding payout for urgent repairs from the WREN FCC Heritage Fund.

The WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grants are awarded to historic churches and chapels on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust. Since 2010, the National Churches Trust has safeguarded the future of 54 English churches and chapels by recommending £2.2 million of WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grants to pay for urgent repairs.

The church of the historically powerful Neville family in Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, St Mary and All Saints, says that its grant of £54,500 came “just the nick of time to tackle urgent repairs” to the roof, drainage and gutters and external stonework. King Richard III, recently reburied in Leicester Cathedral was born in the village, and Mary Queen of Scots was executed there.  The grant will form a major contribution to a repair appeal fund recently launched by HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO.

In Warwickshire, Compton Verney chapel, one of the few churches designed by architect and landscape gardener Capability Brown, is to receive £47,800 for repairs to exterior stone and lead work and to restore windows. The funding will help bring the chapel alive with music, services, events and activities in time for the Capability Brown Festival in 2016.

St Laurence, Diddington, Cambridgeshire, a church listed in the Domesday Book and the smallest parish in the county, receives a grant of £52,000 for repairs to its tower and two windows.

Broadcaster and journalist Huw Edwards, Vice President of the National Churches Trust, says, “The UK’s churches and chapels are a treasure trove of architecture, history and faith. But the cost of keeping them in good repair is far beyond the means of congregations. That’s why I’m delighted that the National Churches Trust has greenlit WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grants totalling £771,641. The funding for these 14 projects will help ensure that the church continues to serve local people for many years to come.” 

 WREN and FCC Environment

WREN is a not-for-profit business that awards grants for community, biodiversity and heritage projects from funds donated by FCC Environment through the Landfill Communities Fund. Peter Moralee, WREN’s grant manager for the FCC Heritage Fund, says, “FCC Environment and WREN are dedicated to supporting projects that safeguard the future of some of the country’s most at risk heritage sites. We are delighted to be working with the National Churches Trust and pleased our funding will go such a long way in preserving these historic sites for generations to come.”

The awards are among those to 26 projects awarded a grant from WREN’s FCC Heritage Fund this year. More than £4.7m has been awarded to 95 heritage projects since the fund was launched in 2010. Projects which could benefit from the fund must be highlighted to WREN by one of its three partner organisations: Historic England, Cadw (Wales) or the National Churches Trust.

For more information about WREN’s FCC Heritage Fund, or to find out if your project could be eligible to receive a grant in 2016, please click here 

 FULL DETAILS OF CHURCHES AND CHAPELS RECEIVING GRANTS BY COUNTY

 CAMBRIDGESHIRE

St Laurence church, Diddington, Cambridgeshire £52,309 WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it to fund repairs to high level masonry, rainwater goods and glazing, which will make the building watertight.

St Laurence, mentioned in the Domesday Book, is the smallest parish in Cambridgeshire.

The vicar Canon Annette Reed says, “Residents in Diddington, a small but lively village, were delighted to receive the news that they were being awarded a WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant towards the major repairs, identified at their last architect’s inspection. The funding will mean urgent repairs can be carried out to the tower masonry and two of the windows. The Church Council are very grateful - and somewhat shocked - by the generous grant and look forward to the work starting.”

 HERTFORDSHIRE

St Faith church, Hexton, Hertfordshire £75,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust to make the building wind and watertight and safeguard the chancel area from rainwater.

St Faith’s dates from the 13th century but parts of it are thought to be older still.

Tony Howells churchwarden of St Faith’s says, “We are thrilled that the National Churches Trust have recommended a magnificent WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant of £75,000 towards the total repair cost of some £137,000. With other grants we have been offered we are now very confident that the essential work will go ahead as planned and will enable St Faith`s to continue its roles as both a church and a community centre.”

LINCOLNSHIRE

1.  St James church, Castle Bytham, Lincolnshire £60,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it to repair the roof of the nave, replace cast iron rainwater goods and improve drainage.

Philip Styan Treasurer of Castle Bytham says, “The grant provided by WREN FCC Heritage Fund will form an essential part of the fund raising package that will enable us to replace the roof of St James. The lead roof was last replaced in 1857 and following years of patching has reached the end of its life. St James church dates back to the 11th century and is  Grade I listed. The new roof will enable many more generations to enjoy this fine historic building.”

2. All Saints church, Croxby, Lincolnshire £75,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches to enable urgent roof repairs and the installation of a new rainwater disposal system.

 All Saints is the last surviving medieval building in Croxby.

Roger Douglas churchwarden says, “To be awarded a WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant is probably the best thing that has happened to All Saints, Croxby since the time it was built. To secure its future, by re-roofing and renewing the rainwater goods, in this small community is inspirational to everyone who live and worship here. Alongside the local people, it also means many more visitors will be able to experience the peace and tranquillity of our ancient church.”

 MERSEYSIDE

Old Christ church, Waterloo, Merseyside £75,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust  to repair the tower and belfry of this Grade II* listed church.

Old Christ Church was designed by Paley, Austin and Paley built in 1891-99 by George Woods and Sons of Bootle. The church has been in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust since 1998 and since 2006 it has been working with the Friends of Old Christ Church to transform the building into a venue for farmers markets, beer festivals, art exhibitions and seasonal fairs, at the heart of local life.

John Bramham Chair of the Friends of Old Christ Church says, “We are thrilled to have received a grant of £75,000 from the WREN FCC Heritage Fund to support the urgent conservation work to the tower at Old Christ Church. It is one of the largest community spaces in the area. The church is used by more than 32,000 people every year and is a very important asset to Waterloo. If the work does not go ahead to the tower there is a real risk that the church might close, so the support from WREN Heritage is invaluable.”

NORFOLK

1. St Ethelbert church, Alby, Norfolk £15,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust to repair the badly leaking church roof and prevent water coming in causing further damage to the church interior.

St Ethelbert is built from Norman flint with a 13th century nave and a 15th century tower.

Rachel Johnson churchwarden says, “Without the grant received from the WREN FCC Heritage Fund these repairs would not be possible leaving the church unsafe for future use and ultimately leading to the closure of this lovely building. The Church Council and congregation are extremely grateful for the funds that will allow us to save our church and continue our ministry in the local community.”

 2. St Peter and St Paul church, Knapton, Norfolk £25,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it to carry out urgent repairs to prevent water getting into the church, protect the tower and preserve the medieval roof, painted ceiling and carved wooden angels.

St Peter and St Paul, which features a medieval double hammerbeam roof with 138 painted angels with spread wings, has been described as ‘probably the handsomest parish church roof in the country’.

The Revd Andrew Jones, Team Rector says, “We are all thrilled at the news that we have been awarded the WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant and that we can finally carry out the vital repairs to our unique church. This is a wonderful opportunity to repair our church for future generations to enjoy.”

3. All Saints church, Narborough, Norfolk £50,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it to repair the church roof and prevent further damage both inside and outside the church.

All Saints contains several impressive monuments to the Spelman family, who lived at nearby Narborough Hall.

The Rector, Canon Stuart Nairn says, “We are delighted at the news of the grant award from the WREN FCC Heritage Fund, which is a big step forward in our raising sufficient funds to re-slate all the roofs of All Saints. The church is at the heart of this community both for worship and community activities including school visits, art exhibitions and concerts, as well as being available for those special moments in people’s lives.”

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE

St Mary and All Saints church, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire £54,552 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust to repair the church roof, drainage and gutters.

St Mary and All Saints is significant because of its links to the House of York during the Wars of the Roses. Several members of the Neville family are buried there, including the third Duke and his wife Cecily, the parents of King Richard III.

Ros Clayton, Chair of Fotheringhay Church Project Group says, “Fotheringhay is a tiny village with a big past and an enormous responsibility for its heritage. Fotheringhay church’s magnificent architecture and close historic ties to King Richard III, who was born here, and to Mary Queen of Scots, who was executed here, make it one of the most important and visited parish churches in England. But inside the church is cold and damp with a leaking roof. We are so grateful that this generous WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust has come in just the nick of time to tackle urgent repairs and help ensure our wonderful church will continue to inspire generations well into the future.”

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE

1. Holy Trinity church, Lenton, Nottinghamshire  £66,980 WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust for essential repairs to the north aisle and clerestory windows to be  completed alongside roof repairs funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Holy Trinity features a rare rectangular font dating from the 12th century which features carvings depicting Christ’s Baptism, Crucifixion and Resurrection

The vicar, the Revd Dr Megan Smith says, “We are thrilled to have received this generous Grant from the WREN FCC Heritage Fund. It will enable us to re-roof and make water-tight the north aisle of the church, as part of a larger project of re-roofing the whole building. We want to secure the future of a valuable 2* listed church building for the future and realise our  vision of using it to engage further with the community.”

YORKSHIRE

St Giles church, Pontefract, West Yorkshire £60,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it to fund the final phase of external repairs.

St Giles, situated in the town’s market place, has a unique octagonal tower. A church has stood on the site since the 12th century.

The vicar, Father Bob Cooper says, “We are delighted to receive the support of the WREN FCC Heritage Fund which will enable us to complete the final phase of repairs to the building. This is a very old church and the current building has seen many changes over the years to meet the needs of the local community. St Giles church has been on the Historic England  “At Risk” register for the last few years and the grant will ensure the preservation of  the town’s most prestigious heritage building for the benefit of future generations of our local community.”

WARWICKSHIRE

1. Compton Verney Chapel in Warwickshire £47,800 WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it repair the exterior stone and leadwork and restore the windows.

Compton Verney Chapel is part of the ‘Capability’ Brown-designed landscape of 120 acres surrounding Compton Verney art gallery and the buildings and structures in that landscape.

The mansion at Compton Verney was remodelled in the 1760s by Robert Adam, who in turn introduced ‘Capability’ Brown to the site. From 1768, Brown transformed the landscape creating sharply defined lakes, bridges, tree belts, carriage drives, paths, vistas and garden buildings. A key element of this was his Grade I-listed Chapel (1776-9), one of the very few buildings known to have been designed by Brown.

Dr Steven Parissien, Director of the Compton Verney Art Gallery and Park says, “We are extremely grateful to the WREN FCC Heritage Fund and the National Churches Trust for their generous support of the restoration of Compton Verney’s Grade I-listed Chapel. Built between 1776-79, it was one of the few designed by architect and landscape gardener Capability Brown. This grant will join with the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund and others to enable us to restore the building fully and once more bring it alive with music, services, events and activities.”

2. St John the Baptist church, Brinklow, Warwickshire £55,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it fund repairs to the church roof.

St John the Baptist offers hospitality and facilities for walkers and cyclists using the route of the Roman Fosse Way.

Jenny Wykes churchwarden says, “We are delighted to have been awarded a grant of £55,000 by the WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant towards our church roof restoration project. This will help us further our plans to put our church back into the centre of community life here in Brinklow. We look forward to working with the National Churches Trust.”

 3. St Peter church, Kineton, Warwickshire £60,000 WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant awarded on the recommendation of the National Churches Trust enabling it to repair masonry and rainwater goods.

St Peter’s is actively involved in many aspects of village life, hosting housing association surgeries, a foodbank and a job club employment advice clinic, made possible after the installation of Wifi.

Project leader Alexandra Gunn says, “We are very pleased to receive this WREN FCC Heritage Fund Grant which will enable us to further restore our beautiful church building. We hope the restoration will leave a lasting legacy for the people of Kineton, preserving the church as a place of worship and a base from which we can continue to help support the local community.”

 

About WREN, FCC Environment and the Landfill Communities Fund

 

WREN is a not-for-profit business that awards grants for community, conservation and heritage projects from funds donated by FCC Environment through the Landfill Communities Fund. Since 1998, WREN has granted over £200m to more than 7,000 projects which benefit people living within 10 miles of a FCC Environment landfill site. For more information please visit www.wren.org.uk

 

FCC Environment is the leading UK waste and resource management company and is part of a global group with a strong heritage in providing services for communities and business. Its vision is to be the environmental company of choice, delivering change for a sustainable future. It employs 2,400 people and operates more than 200 facilities across England, Scotland and Wales. FCC Environment donates the LCF tax credits that are generated by its operations to WREN, in order to add value to the environmental and social infrastructure of the communities around landfill sites. www.fccenvironment.co.uk

 

The Landfill Communities Fund (LCF) is an innovative tax credit scheme enabling operators (LOs) to contribute money to organisations enrolled with ENTRUST as Environmental Bodies (EBs). EBs use this funding for a wide range of community and environmental projects in the vicinity of landfill sites. LOs are able to claim a credit (currently 5.7%) against their landfill tax liability for 90% of the contributions they make. Since its inception in 1996, over £1.4billion has been spent on more than 53,000 projects across the UK. For further information please visit www.entrust.org.uk or see HMRC’s general guide to landfill tax (https://www.gov.uk/business-tax/landfill-tax)