Christmas funding boost for the UK’s historic churches

Published: Wednesday, December 11, 2019

 

63 churches and chapels are to be helped with grants totalling over £520,000 thanks to the National Churches Trust.

11 of the churches being helped are on the Historic England 'Heritage at Risk' register.

Broadcaster and journalist Huw Edwards, Vice President of The National Churches Trust, said:

“The UK's historic churches and chapels are a vital part of our national heritage. But to survive, many need to carry out urgent repairs and install modern facilities. The cost of this work is far beyond what most congregations can pay for themselves.”

“So I’m delighted that the Trust is providing grants of £520,000 to keep more churches and chapels in good repair so that they can remain open and in good repair and benefit local communities all around the UK.”

National Churches Trust helps the UK's churches

In 2019, the Trust distributed nearly £1.3 million to help churches and chapels tackle urgent repairs, maintenance work and install modern facilities such as kitchens and toilets.

A wide range of grants from the National Churches Trust will be available to help places of worship in 2020 and full details can be found at www.nationalchurchestrust.org/grants

Our work is made possible by the generosity of our Friends and supporters, including Trusts and Foundations. Why not help  us to save more churches by making a donation or by becoming a Friend.

 

Churches being helped include:

  • A £40,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund extensive roof repairs at the Grade A listed Cathedral Church of St Machar, Aberdeen, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church is a place of great antiquity - there has been a church on the site since about 580.  The oak ceiling, of international importance, was erected in 1520. It is supported on all four sides by a deep wooden frieze. It is decorated with 48 carved and painted heraldic shields; both carving and painting are of very high quality.

  • A £30,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund major work to the Grade I listed All Saints church, Newcastle upon Tyne, enabling it to once again open as a church. The building is currently on the Historic England ‘At Risk Register’.

Sir John Betjeman, former Poet Laureate, called All Saints church, “one of the finest English Georgian churches”. Deconsecrated in 1961, All Saints was refurbished in 1984 for use as an urban study centre. From the 1990s until the completion of The Sage in 2004, the excellent acoustics were put to use as the home for the Northern Sinfonia.

  • A £25,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund the replacement of stone mullions and tracery and the re-installation of the church's coloured glass at the Trinity Methodist church, York, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The Primitive Methodist Church in Monkgate was built to replace the Ebenezer Chapel in Little Stonegate, which had become inadequate for the needs of the growing congregation during the 1880’s. Choirmaster Archibald William Sargent led hymn recitals at the chapel that were broadcast by the BBC between 1937 and 1947. The chapel roof was also used for fire watches of York County Hospital during Second World War bombing raids on the city.

Full details

Full details of 17 Cornerstone Grants awarded can be found below.

In addition  46 Gateway and Foundation Grants have been awarded to fund a range of church building maintenance and development projects. A full list awards can be found here:

Gateway and Foundation Grants

GLOUCESTERSHIRE

  • Redmarley D'Abitot, St Bartholomew church, GL19 3HS

Church of England - Diocese of Gloucester

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the tower roof at the Grade II listed St Bartholomew church, Redmarley D'Abitot, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England At Risk Register.

The church

There has been a church on this site since 1290.  In 1553 the church built a tower surmounted by a steeple with four bells and one altar. In 1738 the upper part and steeple were demolished and a new bell tower, with six bells, was built.

There are examples of graffiti on the lead roof of the tower which is believed to date from the time this work was carried out.

The village became a battlefield for a Civil War skirmish during the siege of Gloucester in 1644, and the tower's base bears the grooves where arrows were sharpened for use in the fighting.

In 1855 the newly appointed Rector rebuilt the church, which was almost  double the size of the original building.

The project

The project will help fund urgent repairs to parapet and rainwater chutes and also the repair of the tower roof.

HAMPSHIRE

  • Appleshaw, St Peter-in-the-Wood church, Andover SP11 9BE

Church of England - Diocese of Winchester

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to rainwater goods, and the installation of a toilet and servery at the Grade II listed St Peter-in-the-Wood church, Appleshaw, helping make the church a community hub.

The church

There has been a church at Appleshaw since the 12th century. Inside, it has wall monuments dating from the 18th century and a Royal Coat of Arms of William IV of 1831. The church features a Victorian octagonal font.

In the tower St Peter-in-the-Wood’s church has a Sanctus bell of the 12th - 13th Century, making it one, if not the oldest, in the Winchester Diocese.

The project

The project will focus on repairs to rainwater goods, stonework, windows, the installation of a toilet and servery and repairs of vestry.

  • Colden Common, Holy Trinity church, SO21 1TL

Church of England - Diocese of Winchester

A £5,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an accessible toilet, a kitchenette and an all-age, all-ability welcome area the Grade II listed Holy Trinity church Colden Common, allowing the church to better serve the local community.

The church

Holy Trinity sits in a graveyard rich in wildlife, a site of Importance for Nature Conservation.

The small church was built in 1843 for £1,620/19s/6d on rough pasture to a design by George Guillaume.  In 1974, the bell turret was struck by lightning and had to be removed.

The history of the church shows different generations have made changes to ensure the building could offer welcome and support for that generation and ensure facilities of the day for the local community and beyond (i.e. organ, heating, electricity). Now this generation can play its part to install the amenities needed for the community and visitors of today and tomorrow.

The project

The project will facilitate the installation of an accessible toilet, kitchenette and a social meeting area.

  • St Helens, Seaview St Helen church,  Isle of Wright PO34 5EF

Church of England - Diocese of Portsmouth

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of a toilet and kitchen at the Grade II listed St Helen’s church, St Helens, making the church better able to serve its community.

The church

The church dates from 1717 and was extensively rebuilt in 1830. It features some fine examples of stained glass windows, including the three-light east window of 1862 by William Wailes, one of England's most accomplished and visionary stained glass manufacturers, which shows the Nativity, Crucifixion and Ascension.

St Helen’s also features a memorial to Edward Grose (1815) who died at the battle of Waterloo.

The project

The project at St Helen’s church will help to fund the installation of a much needd toilet and kitchen.

LEICESTERSHIRE

  • North Kilworth, St Andrew church, LE17 6EZ

Church of England - Diocese of Leicester

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the instalation of toilets, a kitchen and improve the church's heating system at the Grade II* listed St Andrew church, North Kilworth, making the church a community hub.

The church

St Andrew's was built 1154 -1189 on the site of a former iron age settlement. The evidence for this is based on excavated pottery and loom weights dating from about 800 BC from an area adjacent to the chancel.

Among the church’s memorials is one to James Belgraves, who was awarded the Military Cross as a World War I flying ace for ‘downing’ 18 planes.

St Andrew’s pulpit uses oak from an Armada ship.

The project

The project will help fund the installation of toilets and a kitchen as part of a comprehensive update.

  • Thorpe Arnold, St Mary the Virgin church, Melton Mowbray LE14 4RU

Church of England - Diocese of Leicester

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs urgently needed after lead theft at the Grade II* listed St Mary the Virgin church, Thorpe Arnold, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England At Risk Register.

The church

St Mary the Virgin lies in the small village of Thorpe Arnold, close to the market town of Melton Mowbray. It is a modest but attractive church and is a clear landmark from the road at the top of a hill, with its distinctive pyramidal capped tower.

The church dates from about 1300, although a church history written by a former vicar in 2000, suggests an earlier date of around 1162. The font has early stylised carvings of St Michael which may be late Saxon or very early Norman.

The project

The project will replace the roofs and also facilitate repairs to the roofs’ timbers. Dislodged stonework will be replaced and new rainwater goods will be installed.

LINCOLNSHIRE

  • Broughton, St Mary church, DN20 0HY

Church of England - Diocese of Lincoln

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund tower repairs at the Grade I listed St Mary's church, Broughton, making the building watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England ‘At Risk Register’.

The church

St Mary’s is one of four Anglo-Saxon churches in North Lincolnshire.

The tower was built in the early 11th century as a ‘tower nave’; the chamber at the foot of the tower being the nave, where originally the congregation stood for services.

Abutting the tower is a remarkable Anglo-Saxon stair turret which appears to have been built against the already standing tower. The turret is cylindrical and consists of a rising helical tunnel made up of concrete-set rubble, its underside still bearing the impressions left by Anglo-Saxon wooden shuttering.

There are a few other examples of cylindrical stair turrets in the UK but only one, All Saints, Brixworth in Northamptonshire, shares Broughton’s helical concrete construction.

The project

The project includes a full survey of the church's tower which is in bad repair and funding for urgent repairs.

  • Spalding, St Mary Church, Long Sutton, PE12 9JE

Church of England - Diocese of Lincoln

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an accessible toilet and upgrade the heating system at the Grade I listed St Mary’s church, Long Sutton and will help the church to better serve its local community.

The church

The church dates from about 1170. It is an ambitious late Romanesque building, as can be seen from the nave which still survives. Long Sutton was granted a charter for a market in 1202 and the detached tower dates from this period, when it would have served as an open structure to shelter the market. 

St Mary’s has the highest, oldest and best preserved timber spire in the country. As the town's prosperity grew it was decided to remodel the church. John Betjeman describes it as the ‘Cathedral of the Fens’ and Simon Jenkins awards it three stars in ‘England's 1000 Best Churches’.

The project

The project will install an accessible toilet.

NORFOLK

  • Old Buckenham, All Saints’ church, NR17 1RP

Church of England - Diocese of Norwich

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs at the Grade I listed All Saints church, Old Buckenham, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England ‘At Risk Register’.

The church

All Saints is a medieval village church with evidence of Saxon and early Norman features.

It has an 11th Century nave, a 15th Century porch and an impressive 11th - 14th Century full height octagonal tower housing six bells. 

All Saints stands in a fascinating heritage landscape as the village of Old Buckenham had an important position in the 12th to 16th centuries. There are the remains and ruins of two castles and an Augustinian Priory within the parish boundary and the church is central to the village’s history.

The project

The project will enable repairs to take place including the replacement of thatch on the nave roof of the church.

OXFORDSHIRE

  • Leckhampstead, St James church, RG20 8QQ

Church of England - Diocese of Oxford

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs and remedy structural movement at the Grade II* listed St James church, Leckhampstead, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England ‘At Risk Register’.

The church

St James’s church is in the North Wessex Downs and is located in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The present building was designed in brick and flint by Samuel Sanders Teulon, whose style was a High Victorian style known as ‘Modern Gothic’.

The first historic record of a church dates from 815AD as Leckhamstede and later Lecanestede in the Domesday Book 12th Century.

A Norman font installed in St Edmund’s church, was moved to St James in 1859 -1860. 

St James also contains priceless artefacts such as an 11th Century font, a 14th  Century bell, a Jacobean pulpit and Georgian altar rails.

The project

The project will help fund urgent roof repairs and remedy structural movement of the roof and church walls.

YORKSHIRE

  • York, Trinity Methodist church, YO31 7PB

A £25,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund the replacement of stone mullions and tracery and the re-installation of the church's coloured glass at the Trinity Methodist church, York, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The Primitive Methodist Church in Monkgate was built to replace the Ebenezer Chapel in Little Stonegate, which had become inadequate for the needs of the growing congregation during the 1880’s.

The new site was chosen because of its proximity to Elmfield College, a Primitive Methodist college on the outskirts of Heworth in the city. The church, designed by F W Dixon of Manchester, was built at a cost of £ 8,000, including furnishings.

Choirmaster Archibald William Sargent led hymn recitals at the chapel that were broadcast by the BBC between 1937 and 1947. The chapel roof was also used for fire watches of York County Hospital during Second World War bombing raids on the city.

The project

The project will help pay for the replacement of stone mullions and tracery and the re-installation of the church's coloured glass.

TYNE AND WEAR

  • Newcastle upon Tyne, All Saints Church, NE1 3UF

A £30,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund major work to the Grade I listed All Saints church, Newcastle upon Tyne, enabling it to once again open as a church. The building is currently on the Historic England ‘At Risk Register’.

The church

Rising above Newcastle Quayside from its prominent hilltop position is the magnificent Baroque tower of All Saints. Completed in 1796, it replaced the medieval church ‘All Hallows’. 

The architect, David Stephenson, produced a stunning design with an elliptical nave; it remains the only elliptical church in England. 27 windows flood the unique elliptical nave with light from every direction at all times of the day.

Sir John Betjeman, former Poet Laureate, called All Saints church, “one of the finest English Georgian churches”. More recently, the Newcastle Chronicle, listed All Saints at the top in their ‘2017 Top Ten List of Newcastle buildings’.

Deconsecrated in 1961, All Saints was refurbished in 1984 for use as an urban study centre. From the 1990s until the completion of The Sage in 2004, the excellent acoustics were put to use as the home for the Northern Sinfonia.

The project

The project will facilitate repairs and installation of facilities plus additional improvement works to enable the building to once again open as a church.

WORCESTERSHIRE

  • Norton Juxta Kempsey, St James the Great church,  Worcester, WR5 2QB

Church of England - Diocese of Worcester

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund tower and roof repairs at the Grade II* listed St James the Great church, Norton Juxta Kempsey, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England ‘At Risk Register’.

The church

The oldest portion of the existing church is part of the Norman wall dating from 1080. The nave is 12th Century and appears to have been lengthened in the 13th Century.

The bell tower seems to have been built around 1370 and contains a Dovecote. There are three bells in the tower. The oldest was cast in Worcester in 1450 by Richard le Bellyterre. The second bell is the largest and was cast by ‘I.M’ which was the makers mark of John Martin. The third bell is the smallest and was cast in Gloucester in 1716 by ‘Abe Rudhall.’

The regimental depot was located in Norton in 1877, since when Norton became a garrison village and St James the Great, a garrison church.

The project

The project will help fund urgent  tower and roof repairs to help remove the church from Historic England’s At Risk Register.

SCOTLAND

ABERDEENSHIRE

  • Aberdeen, Cathedral Church of St Machar, AB24 1RQ

Church of Scotland

A £40,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund extensive roof repairs at the Grade A listed Cathedral Church of St Machar, Aberdeen, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Since 1690 St Machar's has been a parish church within the Church of Scotland. In spite of its name, it is not a Cathedral.

It is a place of great antiquity - there has been a church on the site since about 580. A Cathedral was begun in the 1130s, but was destroyed by the army of Edward III of England in 1336.

Most of the existing building was constructed between 1380 and 1520; it was once longer, but the central tower, crossing and transepts collapsed in 1688, leaving the nave, and turning a cruciform church into a basilica.

The oak ceiling, of international importance, was erected in 1520. It is supported on all four sides by a deep wooden frieze. It is decorated with 48 carved and painted heraldic shields; both carving and painting are of very high quality.

The shields include the arms of Pope, Leo X. That the arms of a Pope can still be found above the communion table after 330 years of Presbyterianism is a matter of great celebration, given that the church was despoiled of much of its statuary in the century after the Reformation.

The project

The project will help fund extensive roof repairs for this historic building.

WALES

DENBIGHSHIRE

  • St Asaph , St Asaph and St Kentigern church, ,LL17 0RD

Church of Wales - Diocese of St Asaph

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of toilets and a kitchen at the Grade II* listed St Asaph and St Kentigern church, St Asaph, making the church a community hub.

The church

The historic medieval parish church of St Asaph, also known as Church of St Kentigern and St Asa (Asaph), lies at the lower end of the High Street in St Asaph. It is reputed that St Kentigern founded the church about 560 AD, with the dedication to St Asa (Asaph) being added in the mid-12th century.

The church is thought to have been reconstructed on the old foundations in 1524 when new windows were incorporated and the structure was re-roofed with the present striking hammerbeams.

A number of the gravestones date to the 17th – 19th century, with the earliest slab being of the bard of Wigfair, Sion Tudur  who was buried on 5th April 1602; a landed proprietor of the lineage of Llywarch Howlbwrch, he spent time at the court in London where he was one of Queen Elizabeth’s bodyguards.

The project

The project will help fund the installation of a much needed accessible toilet, and a kitchen for the church.

MONTGOMERY

  • Churchstoke, St Nicholas’ church, SY15 6AF

Church of England - Diocese of Hereford

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Grant will help fund the installation of two toilets and a kitchen extension at the Grade II listed church of St Nicholas’, Churchstoke, making the church better able to making the church better able to serve its community.

The church

The original medieval church is mentioned in the Domesday Book (1086) and for much of this period was staffed by Augustinian monks from neighbouring Chirbury Priory. A font from this period was recently rescued from the churchyard.

 In 1881, a major reordering was undertaken by the Revd Robert Moore-White, Vicar of Churchstoke for 60 years and the church was laid out in its present form. The vicar commented that ‘the pews had been so arranged that one half of the congregation were looking at the other half. Whether they were considering the bonnets that were worn or winking at each other he could not tell’.

The tower has some marks caused by gunfire: in 1646 Parliamentary forces attacked a Royalist contingent which had taken refuge in the church. A contemporary said there had been a ‘hotte bickering’ at the church!

The project

The project will help fund the installation of two toilets and a kitchen extension.

NORTHERN IRELAND

  • Tullyherron - St Teresa church, Mountnorris, Armagh BT60 2UF

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs at the Grade B listed St Teresa church, Tullyherron, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

St Teresa’s Tullyherron was consecrated in 1869..

The church has an intriguing story. From its modest beginnings in about 1813 as a ‘thatched barn’ (which was an old farm-shed in its day) through the efforts of successive generations it has evolved into what is a truly beautiful example of Irish rural ecclesiastical architecture.

The project

The project will fund urgent repairs to the church's roof, treat roof timbers and install new rainwater goods.