Summer celebrations as 45 churches awarded National Churches Trust grants

Published: Friday, August 9, 2019

 

Nine of the churches being helped are on the Historic England 'Heritage at Risk' register.

All Saints, Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire, described as the 'Holy of Holies' of Morris stained glass, St Petrock, Timberscombe, Somerset a church with a stunning 1500s fan vaulted rood screen and churches on two remote Scottish islands, Howmore church on the Isle of South Uist and Tiree parish church on the Isle of Tiree are amongst 45 churches and chapels in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland whose future has been secured thanks to grants from the National Churches Trust.

Broadcaster and journalist Huw Edwards, Vice President of The National Churches Trust, said:

“The UK's historic churches and chapels are a vital part of our national heritage. But to survive, many need to carry out urgent repairs and install modern facilities. The cost of this work is far beyond what most congregations can pay for themselves.”

“So I’m delighted that the Trust is providing grants of £290,000 to keep more churches and chapels in good repair so that they can remain open and benefit local communities.”

National Churches Trust grants

Last year, the National Churches Trust helped support 202 projects with grants of £1.2 million. 23 churches and chapels were removed from the Heritage at Risk Register in 2018 with the support of the Trust’s grants.

Our work is made possible by the generosity of our Friends and supporters, including Trusts and Foundations. Why not help  us to save more churches by making a donation or by becoming a Friend.

Full details of  21 Cornerstone Grants awarded can be found below.

In addition Gateway and Foundation Grants have been awarded to fund a range of church building maintenance and development projects.

The National Churches Trust funds churches and chapels open for worship throughout the UK, including both listed and unlisted buildings and nine of the latest grants have been awarded to unlisted buildings, which find it particularly hard to source funds for repairs and the installation of new facilities.

Churches and chapels open for regular public worship (i.e. more than six services a year) and located in England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands can apply for a grant from the National Churches Trust.  More details on our grants page.

Churches being helped include:

  • St Petrock, Timberscombe, Somerset -  A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an accessible toilet and a servery at the Grade I listed St Petrock’s church, Timberscombe, helping the church to better serve its local community.  The church has a stunning 1500s fan vaulted rood screen locally made in Dunster, a rare survival with most having been destroyed during the Reformation.
  •  All Saints, Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire -  A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs and replacement of rainwater goods following lead theft at the Grade I listed All Saints’ church, Middleton Cheney, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is on the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register. The church building is perhaps most famous for its collection of Morris & Co windows and two painted ceilings designed by William Morris. The church has been described as, ‘a place of great enjoyment, the Holy of Holies of Morris glass’.
  •  St Edmund or St James, Blunham, Bedfordshire  - St Edmund or St James, Blunham, a  Grade I Listed church linked to the famous poet John Donne receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant to support the installation of an accessible toilet and kitchen, helping the church to better  serve its community. The poet John Donne was Rector of St Edmund of St James’ between 1621 and 1631 and gave the church a chalice which is now on display at St Albans Abbey

 Also receiving funding are two churches on Scottish islands.

  • Howmore Church, Isle of South Uist, Eilean Siar (Outer Hebrides) - A  £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the external stonework and the installation of toilets at the Grade B listed Howmore church, South Uist. Howmore church was built in 1858 by local craftsmen who were members of the small Protestant community within South Uist. It is built on a small hill and visible from the sea and for generations it has been used by local fishermen as a reassuring point of reference.
  •  Tiree  parish church, Isle of Tiree,  Inner Hebrides - A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund accessible toilet facilities, a separate kitchen and separate sound proofed meeting room. The church is situated in the centre of the Island of Tiree and is said to be modelled on Iona Abbey. The church has immense value to the whole of Tiree’s community and provides a central core to Island life.  

 

ENGLAND

Bedfordshire

Blunham

St Edmund or St James

Church of England - Diocese of St Albans

Grade I Listing

St Edmund or St James, Blunham, a much-loved Bedfordshire church linked to the famous poet John Donne receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help support the installation of an accessible toilet and kitchen, helping the church to be better able to serve its community.

The church

The tower is the oldest part of the church. The internal and external arches are both Norman, dating perhaps from the 12th century. There are also two Norman windows, which are visible only from inside the tower on the ground floor. Much of the exterior of the church appears to date from 1583 and is an important example of post-reformation architecture. The poet John Donne was Rector of St Edmund of St James’ between 1621 and 1631 and gave the church a chalice which is now on display at St Albans Abbey.

 The project

The project will support the installation of an accessible toilet and kitchen. It will allow the church members to provide better facilities to be used by the community as a whole.

Sue Dodson and Shelagh Ashley, church wardens at St Edmund or St James church said:

“We would like to thank the National Churches Trust for helping us to finally make this project a reality. It was originally launched as our ‘Millennium Project’ in 1997 so we are looking forward to having facilities to enable us to host additional community events, such as a monthly lunch and a breakfast club.”

Buckinghamshire

St Leonard, Grendon Underwood

Church of England - Diocese of Oxford

Grade II*

On Historic England’s Heritage At Risk Register

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the roof, masonry and rainwater goods at the Grade II* listed St Leonard’s church, Grendon Underwood, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Records about the church date back to 1223. Part of the nave is probably from the 12th Century and the chancel dates back from the 14th Century.  The tower was built around 1460.  There are wooden panels on the side of the pulpit which date back from the 1620s and there are three marble monuments commemorating local dignatories dating back to the 18th Century.

The project

The project will repair the roof, rainwater goods and masonry following beetle infestation and lead theft.  The lead roof will be replaced with slate tiles

 David Hiscock (Team Rector) said:

“We are delighted to receive this support from the National Churches Trust.  The church continues to be the focal point of the village for worship.  In recent years we have organized live entertainment, public meetings, breakfasts and hot lunches in winter and afternoon teas in summer.  It is fantastic to know that once this work is complete, we will have a building for future generations to enjoy.”

 

Derbyshire

Bolsover

Hilltop Methodist Church

Unlisted

A £5,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the church to enlarge and re-equip the current small kitchen at the Hilltop Methodist church, Bolsover, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

Hilltop Methodist church opened in 1896 and has been serving the local community for over 120 years. Originally the church had a balcony, but this was converted into a meeting room and an additional extension was added to the building in 1991.

In 2008 the church established the Freedom Community Project to reach out and offer practical support to the local community, which had suffered enormously through loss of employment with the closure of local pits and ancillary industries in the late 1990's and was struggling to recover.

The project provides free client support and guidance services helping people with a range of issues such as grant and benefit claims, unemployment benefit problems, housing applications, debt counselling and practical help in responding to creditors.

The project

The grant will enable the church to enlarge and re-equip the current small, cramped kitchen so that the community support centre can be open for five days a week, helping marginalised  people on the edge of society access to support services when required.

Rev Sean Adair, Superintendent Minister at Hilltop Methodist church, said:

“The church had been ‘bursting at the seams’ with much-needed community work over the past decade, and the building itself, particularly the kitchen was now in need of refurbishment."

 “During the recession in 2008, our church members realised they had to look outward and do more to help the community; things weren’t good and a lot of people needed some help. Bolsover has suffered a lot, both economically and socially, since the pit closures began in 1993."

“Over decades this had led to poverty, a lack of confidence, low expectations and little social mobility. Much of the work in Bolsover these days is temporary and the poorest people don’t have cars; transport to work or study elsewhere is limited and too expensive for many.

“We established through the Freedom Community Project a free café for anyone affected by social isolation. From this, church members and volunteers really began to understand the depth of poverty in our area and the many and varied needs of people who had received no, or very little, support for years.”

“The grant from the National Churches Trust will help us expand our much needed free café facility as we aim to meet the needs of our local community and we thank them for their generous support.”

Durham

St Andrew, Dalton-le-Dale, Seaham

Church of England - Diocese of Durham

Grade II*

 A  £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund repairs to the church walls to prevent damp at the Grade II* listed St Andrew’s church, Dalton-le-Dale, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

St Andrew’s was originally a Anglo Saxon Church built between 1150-55 and still has its original Norman Doorway. Another major feature of the church is the Anglo Saxon sundial located in the wall above the south porch. With its twisted rope design, it is inscribed with Anglo-Saxon tides not hours, which was the only method of timekeeping before the introduction of clocks.

 The project

The project will repair the church walls to prevent damp. The work includes repointing with lime mortar, replacing existing internal paint with breathable paint and replacing several stones in the west wall.

Herefordshire

Burghill

St Mary the Virgin

Church of England - Diocese of Hereford

Grade II* Listed

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the church tower at the Grade II* listed St Mary the Virgin church, Burghill, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Founded on this site in the 12th Century, this beautiful church was well known to many famous people in history including Sir Edward Elgar and the poets Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southey.

The project

The project will support urgent repairs to the 19th Century church tower.

Liz Donovan, church warden and David Lunn, PCC treasurer at St Mary the Virgin said:

“We are absolutely delighted to receive this grant which will enable us to complete the repairs to the tower and which are phase one of a larger project to repair the medieval porch and improve toilet and kitchen facilities within the church.”

“We are holding a Heritage Day of music and poetry with special reference to Sir Edward Elgar, William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge on Saturday September 14th.The tower will be also be open to the public with an opportunity to “Have a Go” at ringing the bells.”

Hertfordshire

Reed

St Mary

Church of England - Diocese of St Albans

Grade I Listing

A  £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the repointing of the tower and walls, and repairs to masonry at the Grade I listed St Mary’s church, Reed, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

St Mary's is a small, rural parish church, dating from the early 11th Century. According to East Herts Archaeological Society, "Excluding St. Albans Abbey, no church in the county has a larger amount of Saxon work at present visible".

The project

The project will allow for the repointing of the tower and walls, and repairs to masonry including windows and belfry openings.

Liz Jakeman, Churchwarden at St Mary’s said:

 “We are delighted to receive such a generous award from The National Churches Trust. It will give significant momentum to us realising our ambition to preserve our much loved church for future generations. I think it true to say that not only the churchgoing population of Reed, but indeed the entire village and beyond are truly grateful to you for enabling us to fulfil our dream.”

“Thank you National Churches Trust.”

Lancashire

Preston (Warton)

St. Paul’s

Church of England – Diocese of Blackburn

Unlisted

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the renovation of the building's roof at St Paul’s church, Warton, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric and allowing a brass band back into the building.

The church

The original church dates from 1724, but was demolished and replaced by the current stone building in 1886 on land donated by Madeline Clifton, widow of Thomas Henry Clifton.

Its design, by Messrs Aldridge & Deacon, of Liverpool, has what is thought to be a unique open flèche bell tower located at the junction of the nave and the chancel roof.

It has a side chapel dedicated to 'Christ the Carpenter', so named to reflect the role of 'the many craftsmen and technicians in the village'. That heritage lives on as the altar is made from wood from the original church, as are the altar rails which are made from oak roof beams.

The project

The project will allow for renovation of the slate roof to stop water ingress.

Ian Fraser, churchwarden at St Paul’s said:

“We are most grateful to the National Churches Trust for awarding us this grant.”

“Over the years, as a church, we had been trying to patch up our old roof, but recently it became clear that a more fundamental approach was needed in order to resolve the leaking roof and fleche. As a village community we have been fundraising for over six years. On a particularly rainy evening event last autumn, the urgency became all too obvious, when an unfortunate brass band member found out that he was sitting in the wrong place, as rainwater constantly dripped into his french horn and down his back!”

“However, I am delighted to say that this National Churches Trust award has enabled us to reach our target and we expect to commence work very shortly.”

“Owing to significant local housing development, our village is expected to more than double in size over the next few years, so when the repairs are completed, we will much be better placed to serve our expanding community.”

“We will also look forward to welcoming back the brass band members to help us celebrate our weatherproof church!”

London

St Mary and Holy Trinity, Bow,

Church of England - Diocese of London

Grade II*

On Historic England’s Heritage At Risk Register

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund drainage repairs and the installation of toilets at the Grade II* listed St Mary and Holy Trinity church, Bow, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

St Mary's was founded in 1311 to serve the community known then as Stratford atte Bow. The oldest parts of the present church building date from the reign of Edward III. It is one of the only surviving medieval buildings in east London and, consequently, represents 700 years of service to the area.

The project

The project will repair and renew the currently inadequate below-ground drainage around the Church itself, improve rainwater protection and will also allow for the installation of two new WCs, one of which will be fully accessible.

Frances Reynolds and Peter Nicholls, the Churchwardens at St Mary’s, said:

 “We are most grateful to the National Churches Trust for this generous and timely award. The monies will assist and enable the completion of our current enhancement and renovation project which will support us in the continuing mission of St Mary’s to serve the parish and the wider local community.

Norfolk

Beighton

All Saints

Church of England - Diocese of Norwich

Grade I Listed - On the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

A  £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund the re-thatching of the roof at the Grade I listed All Saints’ church, Beighton, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

This small rural church is a 14th century building of flint with stone dressings. The nave roof is thatched with eyebrows over the clerestory windows and is supported by 28 original 14th Century single-framed scissor braced collar rafters.

The project

Work will re-thatch the church’s nave and repair flint work to the north and south nave walls. Further improvements including installing mains water, an accessible toilet and a kitchenette.

The Reverend Martin Greenland, Rector, and Mrs Ann Adey, churchwarden at All Saints’ church said:

 “With the support of the local community, we have been planning, praying and fundraising for this for five years: the National Churches Trust grant is the one which has finally got us over the line. Thank you so much; we are delighted!”

Thursford

St Andrew

Church of England - Diocese of Norwich

Grade II* Listed

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an accessible toilet at the Grade II* listed St Andrew’s church, Thursford, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

The church dates back to the 13th Century but was extensively restored in the late 19th Century and contains some notable Victorian stained glass. This includes the east window designed by Albert Moore and described by Pevsner as "one of the most beautiful of its time in England".

The project

The project will allow the installation of an accessible toilet in the current vestry and a kitchenette, with associated drainage works.

In a joint statement the St Andrew’s Parochial Church Council said:

 “We are so grateful to National Churches Trust for their offer of a £10,000 grant, which is a huge contribution towards helping us make the church a community facility as well as a centre for services.”

“We raise money regularly for the fabric of the church through well attended concerts and events, but working in a small community, we can only achieve our objectives with the generosity of organisations like the National Churches Trust.”

Northamptonshire

Flore

All Saints

Church of England - Diocese of Peterborough

Grade II*

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund stone work repairs at the Grade II* listed All Saints’ church, Flore, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The parish and village of Flore were founded in Saxon times. The earliest documentary reference to the church relates to the appropriation of the church to Merton Priory between 1186 and 1200.

The oldest parts of the building we are the base of the tower and nave, dating from the 12th century. In more recent years the Chancel ceiling was designed by S.E. Dykes Bowers.  

The project

The project, which is the first phase of significant work, will enable stone repairs predominantly to the tower. Some of the deteriorating window surrounds will also be restored along with rain water goods.

Sue Raven, Churchwarden at All Saints church said:

“We are delighted that the National Churches Trust has awarded us a grant towards the significant stone work repairs we must undertake. We appreciate that it is difficult in the present financial climate to secure funding from charities to support vital preservation work, and so this grant together with other funding is allowing us to start this critical refurbishment works.”

“This is only the first phase and, in the near future, we will need to approach other charities and to continue fund raising to secure the money to complete the project.”

Middleton Cheney

All Saints

Church of England - Diocese of Peterborough

Grade I - On the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs and replacement of rainwater goods following lead theft at the Grade I listed All Saints’ church, Middleton Cheney, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The church building dates from about 1300 but is perhaps most famous for its collection of Morris & Co windows and two painted ceilings designed by William Morris. The church has been described as, ‘a place of great enjoyment, the Holy of Holies of Morris glass’.

In the churchyard the bodies of 46 Parliamentarian soldiers were buried after the battle of Middleton Cheney in 1642.

The project

The project will support roof repair and the replacement of rainwater goods following lead theft. It will make the building watertight once again, and protect its valuable interior from further damage.

Bridget Robb and Mike Wilks, churchwardens at All Saints, said:

“Having the responsibility of caring for a Grade I listed building is often a headache. The third time our lead was stolen the village community understandably refused to support us using lead again on the roof. We have therefore battled to get approval for re-covering the roof with steel which has no scrap value, which is looking really good, but raising the money for a project of this size was always going to be a challenge. “

“The National Lottery Heritage Fund have given us our first block of money to get the project started, but the money from the National Churches Trust has come as a real answer to prayer to help us complete the project. We are most grateful to them.”

Shropshire

Minsterley

Holy Trinity

Church of England - Diocese of Hereford

Grade II* Listed - On the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

A £30,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund masonry and repointing repairs at the Grade II* listed Holy Trinity church, Minsterley, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The present church in Minsterley was built between 1688 and 1689 at the expense of the 1st Viscount Weymouth who was a member of the Thynne family, some of whom lived in Minsterley Hall. Because the late 17th Century was not a great period of church building outside London, Minsterley’s church is considered a rarity, and doubly so by virtue of its rustic classical-baroque stylistic mixture.

One of the most notable features of this church is the display of Maidens’ Garlands which are historically rare. They are known as Virgins’ Crowns and they hang above the gallery. The earliest dates from 1726, the last, 1794.

The project

The project will allow masonry and window-surround repairs and the repointing of some walls.

Sylvia Shorthouse and Timothy Watson, church wardens at Holy Trinity said:

“We are delighted to receive this grant and it will help enormously towards the urgent repair work that is pending on our historic building, enabling it to be preserved for many years in the future.”

Somerset

Timberscombe

St Petrock

Church of England - Diocese of Bath & Wells

Listed Grade I

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund the installation of an accessible toilet and a servery at the Grade I listed St Petrock’s church, Timberscombe, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

The church is dedicated to Saint Petroc, who probably visited the parish in the 6th century. The church has a stunning 1500s fan vaulted rood screen locally made in Dunster, a rare survival with most having been destroyed during the Reformation.

The project

Work will take place to provide an ambulatory accessible toilet in an area of the existing vestry, and also a servery in the south aisle.

John Gratton and Mary Holcombe, churchwardens at St Petrock’s, said:

“For some time we have been aware that to really provide spiritual comfort as well as physical comfort to all who visit our beautiful church, modern facilities are essential and will help us to develop stronger community projects which secure the long term future of a wonderful heritage asset.”

“ We have worked with the Parish Council, Historic England, Exmoor National Park and others to make our plans sensitive to our Listed building in rural Exmoor and a huge variety of fundraising has been undertaken to draw the community together in a joint enterprise to respect the past and plan for the future.”

“We are thrilled that the National Churches Trust has given this terrific boost to our target amount and we will continue to work hard to secure the balance of funding now needed to make our vision a reality. Thank you.”

Suffolk

Cavendish

St Mary the Virgin

Church of England - Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich

Grade I - On the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk’ Register.

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the upper tower, to preserve its historic fabric and render the building safe again, without barrier fencing and restricted entry.

The church

The church has stood at the heart of the small Suffolk village of Cavendish since the Middle Ages. A Saxon church stood on the site in 1086 when the Domesday Book was compiled. The present building dates from about 1300 to about 1485, with some 19th Century additions and alterations. One of its highlights is a 15th Century brass lectern thought to have been given to the church by Queen Elizabeth I.

The chancel was funded from the Will of Sir John Cavendish, who the village was named after and who was an ancestor of both the Cavendish and the Devonshire dynasties. He lived in the village and was killed in connection with the Peasant’s Revolt.

The project

The project will restore the upper tower so that parts of it are no longer in danger of falling down and the church can reopen without the current safety barriers and restricted entry.

Graham Jenkin and Janice Brett, Church Wardens at St Mary’s church, said:

“This grant is a significant help towards the target of £97,000, bringing available resources now to £83,000 for completing the tower restoration in one efficient project and avoiding a much longer term and more expensive two stage approach.”

Tyne & Wear

St Wilfrid, Newcastle upon Tyne

Church of England - Diocese of Newcastle

 A  £5,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help reconfigure the church to include toilet, kitchen and meeting room at St Wilfrid’s church, Newcastle upon Tyne, ensuring that the church to better able to serve its local community.

The church

The church was built in 1967 to serve the Newbiggin housing estate in the city. Surprisingly the church was built by volunteer labour and not to the original designs of the architect. The foundations of St Wilfrid's are heavily reinforced as the church is built on the remains of old mine workings.

 The project

The project will reconfigure church to include toilet, kitchen and meeting room.

Yorkshire - West Yorkshire

Leeds (Rounday)

St Edmund

Church of England - Diocese of Leeds

Grade I

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the roof and rainwater goods at the Grade II listed St Edmund’s church, Roundhay, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

St Edmund’s church was consecrated in 1909 and is a centrepiece of the surrounding suburbs in this Conservation Area.

Roundhay, where St Edmund’s is situated, is described by English Heritage as ‘developed at the beginning of the 20th century as one of Leeds’s finest suburbs and its grand churches reflect the wealth of people who settled there.’

The church building is cathedral like in size and height and has a wider than usual nave with comparatively narrow side ambulatories. It is of an unusual construction being of reinforced concrete with a stone facing. Nine of the stained glass windows  are by James Powell and Sons of Whitefriars, London.

The project

Work will repair significant damage to the aisle roof coverings, upstands and flashing and the tiles over all the sloping roofs as well as repairing the rainwater goods.

Rev Nigel Wright, Vicar at St Edmund’s Roundhay, said:

“We are delighted with the news that the National Churches Trust are providing a substantial grant to help fund crucial repairs to our much-loved church.”

“St Edmund’s is an active and lively church, attracting some 6,000 people per year in church and community-based events. The financial contributions of the National Churches Trust, together with all our financial contributors, will ensure this engagement can continue for many years to come. With grateful thanks for the vital work and support of the National Churches Trust.”

North Yorkshire

York

York Baptist Church

Grade II

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund roof repairs at the Grade II listed York Baptist church making the building watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Land in Priory Street was purchased in February 1866 for York Baptist church and the foundation stone was laid in January 1867. The Baptist church is the first Gothic style non-conformist chapel in the city, and one of the few still remaining. The church architect was William Peachey of Darlington and the building was opened in June 1868.

The project

The project will remove and replace the faulty roof coverings, reset the ridge tiles, repair stonework and replace missing mortar in stone work.

John Green, Church Worker at York Baptist Church, said:

"Our church building is over 150 years old.  Although basically sound, time has taken its toll and some deterioration has occurred.  This is particularly in the roof, where water seepage into the upstairs rooms has meant a major renovation of the slate roof covering has become necessary.”

“We are delighted that the National Churches Trust has contributed £10,000 towards our costs. A watertight roof means that the upper rooms will not have to be closed off and can continue to be used to share the good news of Jesus with those who attend the activities that we run throughout the week."  

SCOTLAND

Argyll and Bute,  Inner Hebrides

Tiree

Tiree parish church

Unlisted 

Church of Scotland -

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund accessible toilet facilities, a separate kitchen and separate sound proofed meeting room at the Tiree parish church helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

Tiree parish church is situated in the centre of the Island and is said to be modelled on Iona Abbey. It was designed by William MacKenzie and built in 1903 on the site of an older building. MacKenzie also designed Salen Parish Church in Mull.

Whilst the church is not listed by Historic Scotland, it has immense value to the whole of Tiree’s community and provides a central core to Island life.

The project

The project will create a pod in the rear of the building to house accessible toilet facilities, a separate kitchen with proper facilities and a separate sound proofed meeting room.

Douglas Allan, Interim Moderator at Tiree parish church said:

"In the time I have spent with the congregation I have been impressed by their commitment and tenacity in pursuing a project to enhance the facilities within the church building.”

“As a traditional church building it has presented challenges in modernising the interior to meet present day needs without detracting from the much loved interior and I believe the proposals as outlined will go a considerable way towards achieving this dream which has been pursued by the church office bearers over a number of years."

Eilean Siar - Outer Hebrides

Isle of South Uist

Howmore Church,

Listing Grade B

A  £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help fund repairs to the external stonework and the installation of toilets at the Grade B listed Howmore Church, South Uist, helping the church to better serve its local community.

The church

Howmore Church was built in 1858 by local craftsmen who were members of the small Protestant community within South Uist. It is built on a small hill and visible from the sea and for generations it has been used by local fishermen as a reassuring point of reference.

The church is an attractive white harled masonry-built structure, it is a plain three bay rectangular building with a gallery. There are simple stained- glass panels in the windows of the two gable ends. It has a unique liturgical and architectural layout with a pine lined interior and enclosed communion table, painted to resemble marble, running down the centre of the church.

The project

The project will support repairs to the external stonework and rainwater goods to stop water ingress and install toilet and kitchen facilities.

A spokesperson at Howmore Church said:

“For close on 1,400 years there has been a Christian presence in Howmore and we are privileged to follow in the footsteps of so many generations of faithful Christians.”

“Betty MacDonald, lifelong resident of the area, speaks on behalf of both the congregation and the community when she says that all welcome the grant funding recently approved, it brings us close to a fully funded project. We are looking forward to shortly appointing a contractor and seeing them move on site.”

Inverness-shire

Eskdale

Roman Catholic

St Mary Beauly

Listing category B

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Cornerstone Grant will help remove cement render from external walls and replace rainwater goods at the Category B listed St Mary’s church, Eskadale, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

Hidden away up a single track road which follows the River Beauly up Strathglass, the Roman Catholic church of St. Mary's Eskadale is an unexpected sight.

It is all the more remarkable for the fact that it was built by the 12th Lord Lovat before the 1829 Act of Catholic Emancipation.

It is a building of unusual architectural sophistication for such a remote rural setting, although it is now suffering the effects of long term water ingress and stone, timber and plaster decay). The church was built in a Neo-Norman style, boasting an impressive spacious interior with side aisles separated from the nave by round Norman columns which, together with the walls and roof, are painted in a variety of colours. An elaborately carved stone altar with reredos behind, and the Lovat tomb to one side, were later additions in a Gothic style by Peter Paul Pugin in 1881.

The project

Work will remove cement render from external walls and re-harl in a traditional, breathable lime-harl. In addition, defective rainwater goods will be replaced and drainage work will stop water ingress.

The Secretary of the Trust at St Mary’s said:

“The Trustees are delighted to have the support of a grant from the National Churches Trust towards our major capital repairs project. It is a once in a lifetime opportunity to restore St. Mary’s Eskadale and secure the building for generations to enjoy.”