Our latest grants help 77 churches and chapels

Published: Wednesday, December 12, 2018

 

77 churches and chapels in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are sharing in a £430,000 Christmas grants payout from the National Churches Trust.

Broadcaster and journalist Huw Edwards, Vice President of The National Churches Trust, said:

“The UK's historic churches and chapels are a vital part of our national heritage. But to survive, many need to carry out urgent repairs and install modern facilities. The cost of this work is far beyond what most congregations can pay for themselves and the latest grants from the National Churches Trust will help ensure that 77 churches and chapels are safe for future generations to enjoy.”

“In 2018 the National Churches Trust awarded grants of £1.2 million to help 202 projects at churches and chapels around the UK.” 

“Demand for funding from the National Churches Trust continues to grow, with 583 grant applications received in 2018, up from 473 grant applications in 2017, a 23% increase. “

Churches being helped include:

  • St Leonard, Shoreditch, LondonIn 1817, it became the first London church to have gaslight.

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund a project to carry out urgent repairs to crumbling stonework on the main front and portico of this Grade I listed church. It was built on the site of a medieval church where many of Shakespeare’s acting company are believed to have been buried – including Richard Burbage, the leading man in many of Shakespeare’s plays. The original medieval floor is just a metre underneath the existing church’s crypt.

  •  St German’s, Adamsdown, Cardiff.  One of the finest Victorian churches in  Wales.

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund repairs to St German’s, Adamsdown to help fix a leaking roof and stone repairs, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The Grade I listed church, built in 1884, is regarded as one of the finest Victorian churches in the country. Its listing by the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW) says it is “amongst the finest 19th century religious buildings in Wales” and describes it as “extremely refined and elegant”.

  • Pickering Methodist church, Pickering, North Yorkshire. The central worship area is largely unchanged since the Victorian era, providing an almost museum-like environment of a bygone age.

A £8,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to re-site the kitchen and toilets of Pickering Methodist church to allow the church to host community events. Pickering Methodist Church was built in 1885. The central worship area is largely unchanged since the Victorian era, providing an almost museum-like environment of a bygone age providing modern church services yet in a space which would still be recognised by worshippers from generations ago.

  • St Peter and St Paul church, Bromyard, Herefordshire. HFS Morgan, who invented the Morgan three-wheeler in 1909, grew up in the rectory of Stoke Lacy – his father and grandfather were rectors in the church for 66 years.

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help make Grade II listed St Peter and Paul church watertight by funding urgent repairs to the roof and spire.The Grade II listed church, largely built in the Victorian era, is thought to date back to the 12th century. Its oldest feature is a Norman arch, but it has many medieval elements, including a 13th-century font and several bells. It has a beautiful chancel screen carved in around 1500.

Claire Walker, Chief Executive of the National Churches Trust said:

“Our income comes from individuals and charitable bodies, not from government or church authorities. So a big thank-you goes to all the supporters whose help has allowed the National Churches Trust to continue its work of keeping the UK’s churches and chapels in good repair, used by local communities and open for worship.”

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11 National Churches Trust Repair Grants and seven Community Grants have been awarded, full details below, listed by county. In addition, 33 Partnership Grants, 23 Maintenance Grants and 3 Project Development Grants were awarded.

ENGLAND

CORNWALL

PENWITH

ST JUST

St Just-in-Penwith Parish Church, St Just, Penzance TR19 7HA

Church of England - Grade II - Diocese of Truro

On The Heritage At Risk Register

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund urgent repairs to a leaking roof and stone work at Grade II listed St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is on the Historic England ‘Heritage at Risk’ register.

The church

The large parish church is located in the centre of St Just-in-Penwith, England’s most westerly town.The earliest written evidence of a church on the site dates to 1254. A ‘new’ church was built in 1334, with extensive rebuilding in the 14th and 15th centuries.

The church also features two medieval wall paintings. One depicts St George and the Dragon, the other shows Christ surrounded by medieval trade tools.

The project

The Victorian slate roof is letting water through and has caused chunks of plaster to break away from the ceiling. The project will make the church watertight by replacing the failing slate, the ceiling, and faulty drains and gutters. This will alleviate damp, helping to safeguard the medieval wall paintings.

Andrew Burt, project and fundraising lead and secretary of the parochial church council (PCC), said:

“As a building of significant historical and architectural interest, it is deeply important to  local residents and visitors alike and the whole town is thrilled that the National Churches Trust has recognised the need to preserve this heritage for future generations by contributing a grant to help secure a new roof for the church.”  

WENDRON

St Wendrona, Helston TR13 8PF

Church of England - Grade I - Diocese of Truro

On The Heritage At Risk Register

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund urgent repairs to a leaking roof at Grade I listed St Wendrona, Wendron, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric. The church is currently on the Historic England ‘Heritage at Risk’ register.

The church

The village church of Wendron dates back to the 13th century, but was mostly built in the 15th century. Its exterior is little altered since then and the church retains a medieval wagon roof and a 15th-century stone font. It was refurbished in the Victoria era.

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage At Risk Register because of the poor condition of the tower roof. Water has come through the roof, causing the timber below to deteriorate.

The project

Large sections of the slate roof will be replaced and rotten wood repaired. Waterproofing features will be renewed, including faulty drains, gutters and leadwork.

Rev David Miller, vicar of Wendron, said: “We are all extremely grateful for the wonderful and generous support provided by the National Churches Trust. Its support has made a huge difference as we have sought to reach our target figure for the essential repairs to our building.”

CUMBRIA

KIRKBY THORE

St Michael, Kirkby Thore

Grade II* - Church of England - Diocese of Carlisle

On The Heritage At Risk Register

A £8,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to install a kitchen and toilet at Grade II* St Michael’s church, enabling the church to host more community events.  The church is on the Historic England ‘Heritage At Risk register.

The church

St Michael dates back to the 12th century, but was largely rebuilt in the 14th century after a Scottish raid destroyed much of the building. Its oldest section is the base of the tower, built in 1150.

The “Great Tom” bell, cast in 1450, is the largest in Cumbria. It is thought to have come from nearby Shap Abbey when the abbey was dissolved under Henry VIII.

The project

It is hoped the new facilities will help return the church to the centre of village life, as it has been for 900 years, enabling it to host a wider variety of gatherings, from school events to parish meetings, and to become a more attractive venue for weddings and baptisms.

Margaret Davidson, chair of St Michael’s parochial church council, said: “We are delighted with, and deeply grateful for, this key support for our very challenging project: to re-engage the people of Kirkby Thore with the heritage of their parish church and truly to make the church available and fit for use by everyone. Without the belief and help of the National Churches Trust and other financial partners we would not now be close to realising our dreams.”

EAST SUSSEX

BRIGHTON

St Mary’s church, Brighton BN2 1PR

Church of England - Grade II* - Diocese of Chichester

On The Heritage At Risk Register

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund urgent repairs to the front of Grade II* listed St Mary’s church in Kemp Town, which has been eroded by wind and salt from the sea.

The church

The Grade II* listed church, built in 1878, was designed by Sir William Emerson, an eminent architect who also designed Kolkata’s Victoria Memorial, a major Indian landmark. Although Gothic Revival in style, it includes Oriental features reflecting Emerson’s many years working in India.

The church was added to Historic England’s Heritage At Risk Register in 2014 and deemed to be in desperate need of repair. A first phase of restoration work was carried out in 2016 to the church’s north aisle, with support from the National Churches Trust.

The project

The west end of this large, historic church sits on a busy street. The repairs will not only ensure the significant heritage of the building is retained and protected, but will also lift the appearance of the entrance aspect and thus make a huge, positive difference to the local neighbourhood.

Fr Andrew Woodward, Priest-in-charge at St Mary’s, said: “We’re utterly delighted with this second grant from the National Churches Trust. The Trust was very generous in its support of a previous round of urgent repairs at St Mary’s and its continued faith in our future means a lot to us. We do a lot of community activities and the grant will help us make the church a safer, more welcoming building for everyone in our neighbourhood.”

GLOUCESTERSHIRE

DOWN HATHERLEY

St Mary and Corpus Christi, Down Hatherley GL2 9QB

Grade II* - Church of England - Diocese of Gloucester

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to install a toilet and kitchenette at Grade II* listed St Mary and Corpus Christi to enable the church to host community events.

The church

St Mary and Corpus Christi was largely rebuilt in 1859 and 1860 but has a 15th century tower, with a Tudor window and doorway. As well as being Grade II* listed, it was among 30 churches to be featured in the BBC Songs of Praise book, The Nation's Favourite Churches.

Its connection to one of America’s founding fathers draws visitors from the United States. Button Gwinnett, the son of the then rector, the Reverend Samuel Gwinnett, emigrated to the US in his 20s and, after becoming a prominent politician in Georgia, represented the province in signing the Declaration of Independence in 1776 – a year later he was killed in a duel.

The project

The church already hosts coffee mornings, strawberry tea afternoons, flower festivals and history and music events, but is limited from doing more by a lack of running water and toilet facilities.

Ellie Stevenson, Churchwarden from St Mary and Corpus Christi, said: “The PCC [parochial church council] is delighted to have the support of the National Churches Trust grant. Providing these much-needed facilities will bring the church up to a standard the public expect and help to make it an even more welcoming place for all”.

HEREFORDSHIRE

STOKE LACY

St Peter and St Paul Church, Bromyard HR7 4HH

Church of England - Diocese of Hereford - Grade II

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help make Grade II listed St Peter and Paul church watertight by funding urgent repairs to the roof and spire.

The church

The Grade II listed church, largely built in the Victorian era, is thought to date back to the 12th century. Its oldest feature is a Norman arch, but it has many medieval elements, including a 13th-century font and several bells. It has a beautiful chancel screen carved in around 1500.

The church attracts visitors from around the world because of its association with the Morgan motor car.

HFS Morgan, who invented the Morgan three-wheeler in 1909, grew up in the rectory of Stoke Lacy – his father and grandfather were rectors in the church for 66 years.

The Morgan family graves are to be found in the graveyard. Stained glass windows in the porch pay tribute to the connection, depicting several of the famous Morgan cars as well as Peter Morgan, the son of HFS, who became chairman of the Morgan Motor Company.

The architect who rebuilt the church in 1863 was FR Kempson, a direct ancestor to the Redgrave acting family whose father was also rector there.

The project

The work, identified as urgent in 2016, will repair the roof and spire and replace gutters and drains in order to prevent damp. The project also includes extensive community engagement plans, focused around the cultural connections of the church and its heritage. It will also see the identification and development of wildlife habitats in the churchyard. A new herb garden is in the planning stages for the churchyard.

Clive Evans, vicar of Stoke Lacy, said: “This generous grant ensures that we can complete the major and urgent aspect of our building restoration work – we are relieved and very grateful to the National Churches Trust.”

LONDON

SHOREDITCH

St Leonard, Shoreditch E1 6JN

Church of England - Grade I - Diocese of London

On The Heritage At Risk Register

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund a project to carry out urgent repairs to crumbling stonework on the main front and portico of Grade I listed St Leonard’s church, Shoreditch. 

The church

Built in a Palladian style in 1736-40, the church was designed by George Dance the Elder, a pupil of Sir Christopher Wren who also designed Mansion House, the official residence of the Mayor of London. In 1817, it became the first London church to have gaslight.

It was built on the site of a medieval church where many of Shakespeare’s acting company are believed to have been buried – including Richard Burbage, the leading man in many of Shakespeare’s plays. The original medieval floor is just a metre underneath the existing church’s crypt.

The project

The project will involve repairing the stone and replacing corroded ironwork. It will also make the church more waterproof, renewing roof coverings and replacing gutters and drains, and introduce access to the portico roof so that maintenance work can be carried out more easily.

Once the work is completed, the church intends to produce a website and booklet that showcase its heritage and will host talks and other events related to the building’s history.

Nicholas Morgan, the project organiser for St Leonard’s, said: “We are over the moon to be awarded such a generous grant from the National Churches Trust. It is a huge step towards our goal of saving our beautiful church for the future and for its community, and of sharing its stories.”

NORFOLK

EAST WALTON

St Mary, East Walton

Grade I - Church of England - Diocese of Norwich

On The Heritage At Risk Register

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund a project to urgently fix broken tiles, leaky windows and loose stonework at Grade I listed St Mary’s church, East Walton, returning a historic building to sound condition.

The church

The church is largely 14th century, while its round tower dates from before 1066. Inside, a few medieval details survive, such as corbel heads – grinning faces carved in stone on the wall – and the Tudor rose sculpted above the chancel door.

Most of the interior is from the 18th-century. Noteworthy features from this period include the stained glass, the boxed pews and the three-tier pulpit.

The project

Urgent work will be undertaken to make the church watertight. Currently, water is seeping in through dilapidated windows and broken tiles and slate on the roof.

The church is the only public building in East Walton and is used for village gatherings and parish meetings. The work will not only make it dry, but warm, too, by fixing a faulty flue attached to the coal burning stove that heats the church.

Reverend Jane Holmes, from St Mary’s, said: “We are so very grateful to the National Churches Trust for its support. East Walton is a small village with less than 100 residents so it is a major challenge to raise the substantial funds required to repair our medieval church building. The work that can now progress will ensure its simple beauty and rich history can continue to be enjoyed for generations to come.”

SOUTH RAYNHAM

St Martin, South Raynham

Church of England - Diocese of Norwich - Grade II*

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund urgent repairs to the roof, stonework and guttering of Grade II* listed St Martin’s church in South Raynham. There is no community hall for miles around and the project will allow the church to become a focal point for the area.

The church

St Martin’s dates back to the 14th century, with 15th-century embellishments. Its most historic feature is a 12th-century carved altar stone, thought to be one of the oldest in England. The church was restored in the 1800s, and some of the medieval windows have been fitted with Victorian stained glass.

The project

The repair work, which has already begun, will return the church to an acceptable standard of use, allowing it to become a meeting place for the local community.

Rev Edward Bundock, rector at St Martin’s, said: “The parochial church council of South Raynham is extremely pleased and grateful to have been awarded this generous grant which will enable us to do all the work necessary to bring our parish church into excellent working order as a place of prayer and as a focus for visitors. The church is a benefit to all parishioners and visitors and we look forward to the time when we can re-open the church and celebrate as a church and as a community.”

MARSHAM

All Saints, Marsham NR10 5RB

Grade I - Church of England - Diocese of Norwich

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to install a toilet and kitchenette at Grade I listed All Saints, Marsham, to support the church in hosting community events.

The church

The Grade I listed church dates back to the early 14th century, though much of the building is 15th century. It has many beautiful medieval features, including a pre-Reformation rood screen, a 15th-century seven sacrament font and a hammer beam roof.

One of the church’s vicars in the 17th century was the Rev Samuel Oates, father of Titus Oates, who notoriously fabricated the “Popish plot”, a supposed Catholic conspiracy to kill King Charles II.

The project

The project will encourage a greater use of the church. The open space will be created by removing some of the pews, laying a tiled floor and introducing cafe-style seating. It will be used to host a dementia cafe, after-school clubs and children’s play groups.

Vicar, Rev David Hagan-Palmer, said: "The generous grant from the National Churches Trust will go towards helping Marsham parish church to remain a centre of the community it serves by providing facilities for a wide range of events from concerts to cafés and family activities as well as continuing to be a place of worship where people can come and spend time in reflection and prayer."

SOMERSET

WEST CHINNOCK

Blessed Virgin Mary

Church of England - Diocese of Bath and Wells - Grade II

A £8,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to install a toilet, servery, secure vestry and heating system, with disabled access throughout, at the Grade II listed Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, so the church can be used for more community events.

The church

A place of worship has stood on the site since 1293 or earlier. The existing church was built in 1889 but its interior is designed to imitate 13th century architecture, with a medieval-style lancet window, amongst other items of architectural interest, including the stained glass. An earlier, smaller church had been demolished to make way for it and much of the material reused.

The project

The project will introduce a much-improved heating system and an accessible toilet as well as a small room for meetings or children’s groups. The servery will allow the church to offer refreshments more easily, instead of water having to be carried in and mugs taken off-site to be cleaned.

It is hoped the work will further open the building up to the community, allowing it to be used for concerts, exhibitions and children’s groups.

Chris Stock, the Project Manager and a Lay Minister (Reader), paid tribute to the spirit in the village which has supported the project since March 2016 when it was first conceived. He said: “West Chinnock can be proud of the improvements made to this much loved and appreciated church.”

YEOVIL, QUEEN CAMEL

St Barnabas, Queen Camel, Yeovil BA22 7NX

Church of England - Diocese of Bath and Wells - Grade I

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund repairs to a leaking roof and tower at Grade I listed St Barnabas church, Queen Camel, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The first recorded church on the site was in 1291, but the present building was built in the 14th and 15th centuries. Many medieval features have survived, including a font, pulpit and imposing rood screen.

The project

The project will replace ageing lead on the roof which has become worn and cracked. The lead on the nave roof is 150 years old, while the lead on the tower is even more ancient, dating back to 1753.

Paul Davis and Morwenna Ford, church wardens at St Barnabas, said: “We are immensely grateful to the National Churches Trust for awarding us the grant, which will enable work to begin on the tower in the next few weeks. Small, rural parishes such as ours find it immensely hard to raise large sums of money for major repairs and we are indebted to the National Churches Trust for its consideration and generosity.”

YORKSHIRE

LEEDS, HOLBECK

St Luke, Holbeck LS11 8PD

Grade II - Church of England - Diocese of Leeds

A £8,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to refurbish the kitchen of Grade II listed St Luke’s church, Holbeck, ensuring the church can function as a hub for the community. 

The church

The Grade II listed church, built in 1872, hosts many social projects, from English-language teaching for Syrian refugees to work experience programmes for young people. To ensure these activities can continue, the church building is being renovated and an extension built, with work starting next year.

The project

After the work is complete the church will be open seven days a week, with at least four events a day – from English-language classes and IT courses to youth clubs, lunch clubs, a community cafe and an advice and drop-in centre.

Reverend Canon Alistair Kaye, vicar at St Luke’s, said: “We are thrilled at the generosity of the National Churches Trust. The funding will help provide a facility which can be enjoyed by local people for many for years to come. This is a much-needed boost for our inner city community and we are very grateful."

PICKERING

Pickering Methodist Church

Grade II - Methodist

A £8,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to re-site the kitchen and toilets of Grade II listed Pickering Methodist church to allow the church to host community events.

The church

Pickering Methodist Church was built in 1885. Its Grade II listed status comes from the fact that the central worship area is largely unchanged since the Victorian era, providing an almost museum-like environment of a bygone age, providing modern church services yet in a space which would still be recognised by worshippers from generations ago.

The project

Moving the kitchen and toilets will allow the church to host more than one activity at a time. A café space will be used for more informal worship, for other events such as a tap-dancing club and as a meeting place – for instance, for mothers waiting to pick up children from playschool.  Wider building work at the church also seeks to make the building more accessible for elderly and disabled people, including the installation of a platform lift.

Reverend Ruth Duck, Minister of Pickering Methodist Church, said: “We are all absolutely delighted with this very generous grant from the National Churches Trust, which will be used to help provide newly sited toilets and a cafe area for our completely modernised community area at the church. We are constantly reminded, by the generosity of organisations like the National Churches Trust and by the way local people have become involved with the project, that what we are doing is absolutely right for the people of the town of Pickering and surrounding areas."

SCOTLAND

FIFE

SALINE

Saline and Blairingone Parish Church, Main Street, Saline KY12 9TL

Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) - Grade B

A £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund a project to fix damp in the sandstone walls of Saline and Blairingone parish church and to replace rotten timbers and linings.

The church

The church, a prominent feature in the West Fife village of Saline, was built in 1810 and designed by William Stark, an eminent architect described as a “genius” by Sir Walter Scott. Stark, who designed the interior of Edinburgh’s neoclassical Signet Library, suffered from poor health and died aged 43, so few of his buildings have survived.

The project

The project will replace the render with a coating that will allow the walls to breathe. It will also remove a redundant chimney that has let water seep through, repair the failed truss, and generally refurbish the roof. Once the restoration work is complete, there are plans to create a museum display and to produce a booklet and leaflet telling the story of the church’s heritage.

Ann Easton, Session Clerk of Saline and Blairingone parish church, said: “Our building is the only place of worship in an extensive rural parish, a valued amenity for the community, and a significant feature of the local heritage. The award of the National Churches Trust grant is a substantial help and encouragement towards realising our vision for sustaining the building and our mission into the future.”

WALES

CAERPHILLY

HENGOED

New Hengoed Baptist Church, Ystrad Mynach

Grade II - Baptist

A £8,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will help fund a project to install a kitchen and toilet at Grade II listed New Hengoed Baptist church so the building can better serve the local community. 

The church

Baptists are believed to have worshipped in the area since 1650. However, they suffered persecution during the reign of Charles II and were forced to meet in secret.  The Grade II listed chapel dates back to 1710, but was rebuilt in 1829 as it had become too small for the local population. Some of the oak interior was salvaged from the original building.

The chapel closed in the 1980s but re-opened in 2010. The building now hosts gatherings for young people and takes part in a Fare Share scheme to turn surplus food from supermarkets into meals for those in need.

The project

It is hoped that the chapel will host a wide variety of services that support the area, from counselling and health care to skills training and children’s play groups.

Rev Kath Miller, from New Hengoed Baptist Church, said: “It has been a privilege to serve this community for the last eight years. The renovations to the building, including the kitchen and toilet installation, will enable a far greater scope for the project and, therefore, meet the needs of so many in the local area.”

CARDIFF

ADAMSDOWN

St German’s Church, Cardiff, Glamorgan CF24 0LA

Church in Wales - Diocese of Llandaff - Grade I

A £15,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund repairs to Grade I listed St German’s, Adamsdown, to help fix a leaking roof and stone repairs, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The Grade I listed church, built in 1884, is regarded as one of the finest Victorian churches in the country. Its listing by the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW) says it is “amongst the finest 19th century religious buildings in Wales” and describes it as “extremely refined and elegant”.

Its architects, George Frederick Bodley and Thomas Garner, were masters of the Gothic Revival. They also designed the Washington National Cathedral, the second largest church building in the United States.

The church is located in a deprived area and in winter it serves as a night shelter and day centre for the homeless.

The project

The project will include replacing part of the roof, restoring stonework and repairing waterproofing features including gutters.

Peter Lovitt, the churchwarden who has been dealing with the application for the grant, said: “It is wonderful to be recognised as being deserving of this grant. It is a great help and a welcome boost to our target fundraising to preserve our beautiful church. It will also enable us to continue and further our work in the local community. Thank you to the National Churches Trust for helping us and churches like us.”

SWANSEA

ST THOMAS

Church of St Thomas, St Thomas, Swansea SA1 8BP

Church in Wales - Diocese of Swansea and Brecon -Grade II

A £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant will help fund urgent repairs to the leaking roof of Grade II listed St Thomas’s, making the church watertight and preserving its historic fabric.

The church

The Grade II listed church was built in 1890 thanks to funding from the Grenfell family, leading industrialists who owned copper mines in Swansea and Cornwall.

The foundation stone was laid by F W Grenfell, a general who commanded army forces in Egypt and Ireland and was later made Baron Grenfell of Kilvey.  The church was repaired after it was hit by a bomb in 1940. Its spire is a Swansea landmark.

The project

The project will replace a large section of the roof and renew waterproofing elements such as drains, pipes and lead gulleys. Brickwork will be repaired and the building’s interior will be able to dry out.

Once the work is complete, the church will be open six days a week. It will provide a night shelter for the homeless and host a food bank.  There are plans to have a classroom in the church for one week a year so children can learn about Swansea’s copper industry. A permanent heritage area will explain about the bombing of the church.

Rev Steven Bunting, from St Thomas’s Church, said: “We are so grateful for the invaluable support of the National Churches Trust. Their generous gift allows us to begin the work of transforming St Thomas Church into a community hub to serve all in the parish. People will see the work beginning on January 7 and over the next 12 months the church will be transformed beyond recognition and we are so excited for the future."