Major funding boost for 70 churches and chapels

Published: Wednesday, August 9, 2017

 

70 churches and chapels in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are set to benefit from rescue funding of £522,241.

15 of the churches being helped are on the Historic England ‘At Risk’ Register.

Churches receiving grants from the National Churches Trust include:

  • St Helen’s on the Island of Lundy in Devon, Grade II listed (pictured above), which receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund urgent roof repairs to help ensure the church remains as the centre of worship on the island and also provides a place of sanctuary, study and refreshment to all who visit Lundy.
  • The Greek Orthodox Church of St Mary Magdalene in St Leonard on Sea, Sussex, Grade II listed, which receives a £6,000 Project Development Grant to prepare for a major funding bid to fix urgent roof repairs.
  • St Michael’s church in Southwold, Suffolk, Grade I listed and with a 15th century rood screen, which receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help fund the installation of kitchen facilities and toilets.
  • Hull Minster, Grade I listed and dating from 1285, which receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund a project to pay for urgent repairs to clerestory windows including to stonework and associated glazing.
  • St George the Martyr in Southwark, London, Grade II* listed and known for its part in Charles Dickens’s Little Dorrit, which  receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help fund urgent repairs to stonework and gutters and to improve the entrance area to create space for a community café.

Huw Edwards, Vice President of The National Churches Trust said:

“I'm delighted that the future of 70 UK churches and chapels is being safeguarded thanks to a £522,241 rescue package from the National Churches Trust. The funding will help ensure that more churches and chapels can continue to flourish at the heart of their communities by safeguarding their architecture and making sure their facilities are up to date.”

Claire Walker, Chief Executive of the National Churches Trust said:

“Our income comes from individuals and charitable bodies, not from government or church authorities.  So a big thank-you goes to all the supporters whose help has allowed the National Churches Trust to continue its work of keeping the UK’s churches and chapels in good repair, used by local communities and open for worship.”

Grant programmes

16 churches receive National Churches Trust Repair Grants to help fund urgent and essential structural repair projects. 7 receive National Churches Trust Community Grants to help fund projects introducing facilities to enable increased community use of places of worship. Full details of all the churches receiving Repair and Community Grants below. You can see photos of the churches receiving Repair and Community Grants on Flickr.

5 churches receive National Churches Trust Project Development Grants, a pilot grant programme offering awards up to £10,000 to support churches to become more sustainable through the diagnosis of issues affecting the church and through development of plans that will be implemented through an application to the Heritage Lottery Fund, or other large church heritage funders. See the full list of churches receiving Project Development Grants.

19 churches receive National Churches Trust Maintenance Grants, a new pilot programme, run in partnership with the Pilgrim Trust, offering awards of between £1,000 and £2,500 to encourage churches to act on small, urgent maintenance issues and repairs to listed church buildings. See the full list of churches receiving Maintenance Grants.

In addition, 23 churches receive National Churches Trust Partnership Grants for urgent repair projects, awarded on the recommendation of local church trusts in England. For the first time, Partnership Grants are awarded to churches in Wales and Northern Ireland. See the full list of churches receiving Partnership Grants.

Cinnamon Network

5 churches and chapels also receive a National Churches Trust micro-grant to set up a Cinnamon Network Recognised Project. The micro-grants will allow churches to set up a social action project such as CAP Money Courses, Make Lunch and Parish Nursing.  The Cinnamon Network is a charity that works with churches to help those most at need in their communities.

FULL LIST OF CHURCHES AWARDED NATIONAL CHURCHES TRUST REPAIR AND COMMUNITY GRANTS FOLLOWS BELOW

ENGLAND

CHESHIRE

WINCLE, St Michael's, SK11 0QH

Diocese of Chester – Church of England - Grade II Website

St Michael’s church, Wincle, receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help fund the installation of a new kitchen and toilet.

The project

With no village hall or community centre, the project involves reordering the church to enable it to be used by more local people. This includes moving the current kitchenette from its position in the tower room to an area vacated by an old pipe organ and installing a new disabled toilet in the tower room.

With new facilities, St Michael’s church  will become the hub of the village with activities for the elderly, activities for families, fitness and well-being events, educational events, additional concerts, music lessons, art classes, craft exhibitions, additional parish meetings, bible study classes and reading groups amongst others.

There are also plans to install superfast broadband which will not otherwise be available to some parts of the community.

As a result of the improvements to the church, it is envisaged that the building will be used regularly by those in the community who might not normally come to church and by neighbouring communities.

The church

The original church was built in 1647 on the site of a Neolithic burial mound. A tower was added about 1815, and the rest of the church was rebuilt in 1882 by Edward Witts. 

Wincle and its neighbour Danebridge together form one of Macclesfield Borough's most picturesque settlements, straddling either side of the River Dane where it separates Cheshire from Staffordshire. Wincle is centred around St Michael's church and adjacent village school, with spectacular moorland views as well as lush woodland and drystone-walled pastures. The rich scenery and well known pubs for eating and drinking, make Wincle a favourite place for walkers and other visitors.

The Revd Dr John Harries, vicar of Bosley, Sutton, Wildboarclough and Wincle commented:

“We are so grateful to the National Churches Trust for this community grant. This award will enable us to provide a facility that will benefit our whole community and provide numerous opportunities for our village to meet together. At a time when many resources are being diverted from rural areas, this award is an endorsement of the importance of our countryside heritage, our villages and the need to invest in local infrastructure.”

CUMBRIA

LAMPLUGH, St Michael, CA14 4TY

Diocese of Carlisle – Church of England - Grade II* Website

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St Michael’s receives an £8,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund repairs to its structure and fabric including windows and surrounds.

The project

The repair project will secure and maintain the building's structural integrity for the foreseeable future allowing people to continue to worship regularly, to hold weddings, baptisms and funerals and to continue to use the church for fellowship and social events including concerts. Currently the church can be used in its entirety but water ingress and obvious signs of damp or dripping water make the building unpleasant and unwelcoming to parishioners and visitors.

The church

St Michael's is a Grade II* building remodelled by William Butterfield (completed in 1870) on the site of the ancient church (c. 1150). The church is the only example of a church in the former county of Cumberland completely designed by William Butterfield. Several of the windows are by Charles Eamer Kempe.

The church, which is located prominently in a dramatic landscape and set against the outlying western fells of the Lake District National Park, is valued by churchgoers and parishioners alike. 

The church is a focal point of the scattered community of Lamplugh providing regular worship and a place for weddings, baptisms, funerals and burials. It is a building in which regular fellowship meetings are held together with concerts, coffee events, and flower festivals and is visited not only for its historical features but for family associations too by those who no longer live in the parish (including visitors from all over the world.)

Robin Megan, churchwarden, said: 

"We are extremely grateful for this very generous and timely grant offer from the National Churches Trust. It helps us greatly with our Restoration Project. Our church is beautiful and much-loved - but needs urgent repairs if it is to be saved for future generations. Thank you."

WORKINGTON St John the Evangelist, CA14 3AX

Diocese of Carlisle - Church of England - Grade II*  Website

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St John the Evangelist, Workington receives a £25,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund urgent repairs to the roof and the base of the tower.

The project

This work is the first urgent phase needed to repair one half of the roof and base of the tower of this architecturally and historically significant church.  The roof leaks in many places on the south side of the church which has caused significant damage to the church ceiling.  This work will make it watertight, sustain the current level of usage and make it safe for public use.

The church

The church dates from 1821 and was built using money from the million pound fund set up by the government to mark the victory at the Battle of Waterloo. The church was designed by King George III's architect Thomas Hardwick and is based on Inigo Jones' design for St Paul's, Covent Garden, which Hardwick had previously restored.

The church is an important landmark in the town of Workington featuring Hardwick's trademark classical style Greek portico facing onto one of the main roads into the town. The tower was added in 1846 replacing a wooden structure destroyed by a gale.

The present interior was designed in 1931 by Sir John Ninian Comper, the renowned Scottish, Anglo-Catholic, ecclesiastical architect.

A spokesman for the church said:

 “The members of St John the Evangelist’s Church, Workington are very grateful to the National Churches Trust for making this generous award to our restoration project. It will allow us to fund fully the re-roofing of the south side of the church roof, and to complete works inside the tower to make it waterproof. Scaffolding work began at the end of July and the slaters will be working on the roof throughout the summer. This programme will stop the deterioration of the church which was the result of water ingress and allow us time to plan and carry out the next phase of our restoration project."

DERBYSHIRE

SHARDLOW St James,  Derby, DE72 2GP

Diocese of Derby – Church of England Anglican - Grade II Website

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St James’ church, Shardlow, receives a £12,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund urgent repairs to the stonework and roof that will protect the building from decay through water ingress and stonework deterioration.

The project

The repairs have been identified as being urgent, requiring attention within the next two years, to avoid ingress of water and potentially dangerous further deterioration of the stonework. The urgent repair and refurbishment covers works include masonry repairs to corroded ferrous cramps and to badly eroded stonework and pointing, repairs to the roof and rainwater goods, and the repair of corroded cast iron window frames.

The church

Lying within the Shardlow Conservation Area, St James' church (designed by Stevens of Derby) was built in the 1830s to serve the expanding village. With its box-pews, tall pulpit, wall-mounted memorials and stained-glass windows, it is a notable example of early Victorian architecture.

Rev. Tony Luke, Rector of St James, Shardlow, said:

 "We are very grateful to have received this grant from the National Churches Trust, as it will help ensure that the building is open for worship for many years to come and also open to the local community as a valuable village asset."

DEVON

LUNDY, St Helen,  Devon, EX39 2LY

Diocese of Exeter – Church of England - Grade II Website

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St Helen’s church receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund work including urgent roof repairs, structural repairs to walls and tower and internal repairs.

The project

The building is in a very exposed location and has suffered from significant storm damage in recent years. Temporary repairs have been, and continue to be undertaken as necessary, but more substantial works of renewal to all parts of the church are now required. First and foremost, the church will be re-roofed, and the rainwater goods and drainage overhauled.

The church

There is evidence of an ancient Christian presence on Lundy in various locations since the 6th  or 7th centuries.

St Helen's is the most recent manifestation of this. The current church was built in 1897 for the Revd Heaven, and the architect was John Norton, who had previously remodelled Tyntesfield House near Bristol. The church is built of Lundy granite with a slated roof and is relatively plain externally.

Internally, the walls are of red, black and white brickwork and the floor is made up of patterned Langwardine tiling. The furnishings of the church come from the regionally important workshop of Harry Hems of Exeter and include a fine Purbeck marble and alabaster reredos depicting the Last Supper. There are stained glass windows by Clayton and Bell of London.

Lundy has a small resident population. Services therefore take place on an irregular basis, with occasional baptisms and wedding blessings. However the church is always available for visiting clergy who may wish to take a service there. The building is used beyond worship in a variety of ways, from housing exhibition boards which provide information to the many visitors on various aspects of the island’s history and ecology, to being used as a venue for talks and lectures. The church also has a very active bell ringing group, who regularly meet on the island to ring.

Revd Brenda Jacobs, Team Rector, Hartland Coast Mission Community, said:

 “We are very grateful for the support of the National Churches Trust and their grant of £20,000. They have caught our vision for St Helen’s which will remain as the centre of worship on the island but will also provide a place of sanctuary, study and refreshment to all who visit Lundy. We look forward to the reopening of the church and hearing the bells ring out once more.”

HEREFORDSHIRE

STAUNTON-ON-WYE St Mary’s church,  HR4 7LW

Diocese of Hereford – Church of England - Grade I  Website  

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St Mary’s church, Staunton-on-Wye,  receives a £12,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund including urgent tower roof and stonework repairs.

The project

Urgent repairs are needed to the building, including repairs to the tower, including the roof, internal floor and wall fittings, window mullions and leaded lights in poor repair.

The condition of the church will markedly improve with the damp and damage rectified. As a result the congregation and visitors will experience more pleasant, comfortable and welcoming surroundings. When the work ends, the church hopes to come off Historic England’s Heritage At Risk Register.

The church

The current building may well date from Norman times. The tower is 13th Century, with arch and bell openings being approximately 1300. The tower ground floor has reused Jacobean panelling (including six 16th century medallions). Outside of worship, the church is used for choir concerts, bell ringing and parish meetings.

A spokesman for the church said:

“The congregation and community of Staunton-on-Wye are delighted at the generosity of this grant, which will greatly support us in meeting the large sum required for the restoration and repair of St Mary’s church.  We are also looking forward to developing proper facilities in the church which will both attract and provide for everyone who comes to this lovely building.”

LONDON

SOUTHWARK

St George the Martyr with St Alphege & St Jude, Southwark,  London, SE1 1JA

Diocese of Southwark – Church of England - Grade II* Website

St George the Martyr, Southwark, receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Grant to help fund urgent repairs to stonework and gutters and to improve the entrance area to create space for a community café.

The church also receives a £2,000 National Churches Trust Micro-Grant in partnership with the Cinnamon Network micro-grant to help set up a Cinnamon Network recognised social action project to help local people.

The project

Repairs at roof level will stop water from coming in so that the church can be kept open for visitors and new programmes. The repairs to the roof level will also help to minimise any deterioration of internal features of this historic building.

The church

The current building is on a site which has been a place of Christian worship since at least the 12th century. The present building is brick built of classical design with Portland stone pediments, string courses and dressings, designed by John Price (1735) with the interior altered by Hedger (1808). The present ornate ceiling by Basil Champneys (1897) was repaired and restored by Thomas Ford (1951) following war damage. The church is known for its part in Charles Dickens’s Little Dorrit, acknowledged in the east window.

The church has grown in its usage from schools, local residents, and tourists since the new Parish Priest arrived and began to open the church, welcome school groups and create a small cafe. Repairs will allow for more people to experience its heritage and embed the church and its heritage as a key part of the local scene.

Fr Jonathan Sedgwick, Priest in Charge of St George the Martyr, said:

“Over the centuries St George the Martyr has undergone great change and development, just like the environment surrounding it. In response to this growth and change, St George the Martyr continues to work in supporting those in the community offering a central point to meet and grow together and we are excited that the National Churches Trust supports our vision for the part a renewed St George’s can play in this community. We look forward to seeing this project develop and become a reality.”

STOKE NEWINGTON

St Andrew, Stoke Newington, N16 5DU

Diocese of London – Church of England - Grade II*

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St Andrew’s church, Stoke Newington, receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help fund a major project to restore a first floor hall including installing toilets and upgrading the kitchen.

The project

The project is to restore the first floor of the hall at St Andrew’s. This includes rewiring and providing a new roof with insulation. The £20,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant will fund the introduction of toilets into the first floor and the repair of the kitchen. There is no kitchen elsewhere in the church and the ground floor toilets are in very poor condition.

The church hall is not currently used for community activities because it is in such poor condition. More importantly, the first floor cannot be used as a nursery and after school club without adequate kitchen and toilet facilities.

When the repairs to the hall are complete, it will be in use every day of the week. Hackney Winter Night Shelter has expressed an interest in using the space and the monthly parish lunches, which anyone can attend, would move to the hall when the kitchen is repaired.

The church

St Andrew’s was built to serve the population of the new London suburb of Stoke Newington. It was consecrated in 1884 and the congregation almost immediately set about decorating the interior according to the designs of the architect, A W Blomfield. The interior is one of the most remarkable churches in England. Almost every available wall is embellished with paintings of a very high standard and the windows are all of stained glass, apart from those on the south side which were destroyed in WWII.

Rev Charis Enga said:

“There is a huge shortage of nursery places for low income families in this part of Stoke Newington and we’re aiming to meet this need.  There is no community hub in this area either and we’re hoping our hall will satisfy this requirement too.  A nursery is proposed for every weekday and the preferred nursery provider also wants to run an after school club.  We’re immensely grateful to the National Churches Trust for its support. The Trust’s help is vital to the success of this project.”

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE

RAUNDS St Peter,  NN9 6JB

Diocese of Peterborough – Church of England - Grade I Website

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St Peter’s church receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund a project that includes underpinning the building, glazing repairs to several windows and wallpainting conservation.

The church

St Peter’s is a Norman church rebuilt in 1220 with additions in 1300 and 1450. It contains many rare features from different centuries, including: Medieval wall paintings; a rare medieval 24 hour clock; important stained glass windows (including the work of Kempe & Co., Francis Skeat and E R Suffling).

These and many other rare features are now in jeopardy owing to subsidence of the building which has already caused considerable damage to the Medieval paintings, the Medieval carvings and the stonework outside. A stained glass window has been removed to preserve and eliminate the danger of any further damage.

The project

The underpinning work will stabilise the church building and prevent further damage occurring in the future. The repair work to the windows will enable them to be restored, removing boards which have been put up to protect them and restoring the window which has had to be removed.

The works will make the building a more attractive place to use and visit. It will form the foundation for later work, including the provision of facilities which will enable the church to be opened up to much wider use. Without this basic work, none of the rest could take place.

The Project Group for St Peter's church said:

''We are extremely grateful for this grant from the National Churches Trust, which will allow us to go ahead and carry out the urgent repairs to stabilise our beautiful Grade I listed church building. These structural issues have been a concern for the church for many years, and so we are delighted that we can now go ahead with the repairs, which will be our first step towards making the building more available to the community.''

NORTHUMBERLAND

STAMFORDHAM St Mary the Virgin NE18 0QQ

Diocese of Newcastle – Church of England - Grade I Website

St Mary’s receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help fund a new toilet in the base of the tower.

The church also receives a £2,000 National Churches Trust Micro-Grant in partnership with the Cinnamon Network micro-grant to help set up a Cinnamon Network recognised social action project to help local people.

The project

At a Community Breakfast in February 2017, attended by some 80 village residents, there was great support shown with the announcement that a toilet is to be built in the church in 2017. Up till now, the Bay Horse Inn, across the road, has made their toilet facilities available. Sadly, the Inn has closed, and the need for a church toilet has become paramount.

By installing an accessible toilet in the tower, which dates back to the 8th century, St Mary’s will have more regular use of the building by the village and people further afield. An added bonus is the fact that the toilet will require a radiator for heating and this will help to protect the fabric of the tower within which the toilet is to be installed.

The church

St Mary’s church is a real gem, a largely Norman church extensively restored in the 19th century. It contains the armorial banners of Lord Stamfordham and Lord Adeane, as well as some wonderful medieval monuments and 19th century stained glass windows. Visitors often comment on the peaceful, spiritual atmosphere and like to spend time praying or just enjoying the stillness.

Revd Rachel Scheffer, Priest in Charge of Stamfordham with Matfen said:

 "The PCC and I are delighted to receive the grant of £10,000 from the National Churches Trust for the installation of an accessible toilet in our wonderful church. St Mary's is a historical gem with many stories to tell but its heartbeat today is also strong. We thoroughly enjoy and value welcoming people to worship, to social events, to major life events in our church building and we will do all we can to make sure that this historic gem is up to the job of being at the centre of our community and at the heart of the spiritual lives of all people in the parish and beyond today and for many years to come. The potential is huge and we look forward to expanding the use of our church building. If anyone would ever like to discuss using our church building we would very much welcome your call.”

SOMERSET

NEWTON ST LOE, Holy Trinity BA2 9BU

Diocese of Bath & Wells – Church of England - Grade II*Website

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

Holy Trinity church receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to carry out urgent structural repairs to its vestry.

The project

The repair work will include underpinning the vestry building to resolve structural movement and damage. This is essential to the future structural stability and fabric of the church. It will ensure that the entire church is safe to use for generations to come. The church will then be able to bring facilities within the building up to modern expectations such as installing a toilet.

There is a strong determination amongst the village residents and farming community to keep the church open for the generations to come. The project will create opportunities for engagement with heritage, architecture and history and allow greater use of the building by students for music, plays and location filming.

The church

A church has stood on the site, close to Newton St Loe Castle and Newton Park, since the 11th century. However the current stone building was constructed in the 14th century with the tower being added in the 15th century. It was restored in 1857. An unusual feature is that the bell tower has a clock face with only one hand. It is within a conservation area.

Grenville Gore-Langton, PCC member of Holy Trinity Newton St Loe said:

"The repairs to Holy Trinity church are costly and we are extremely grateful to National Churches Trust for their financial support. The repairs will be a good example of church restoration for all to see and I am delighted that the future of the building with so much history is assured for generations to come.

SUFFOLK

SOUTHWOLD, St Edmund, King and Martyr IP18 6JA

Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich – Church of England - Grade I  Web address

St Michael’s church, Southwold, receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help fund the installation of kitchen facilities and toilets.

The project

The project includes the provision of kitchen facilities and toilets. The church has long recognised the need for toilets as a basic requirement for those using the building.  It is a vital provision when working with the elderly and children, an essential for concerts and when people have travelled a long way for weddings and funerals. The lack of basic refreshment facilities has also been a deterrent to worshippers. When cold in winter the elderly stay away. It is a key part of offering a welcome and of encouraging people to linger to be able to offer a cup of coffee.

The church

St Edmund’s church is Grade I listed, built from 1430-1470, and situated in the centre of the town in a conservation area. The exterior is an excellent example of East Anglian flint work.  Inside, there are several important heritage features including an elaborately decorated ceiling with carved and painted angels.

The most noteworthy feature of St Edmunds is its rood screen that goes right across the church.  It dates back to the late 15th century with the most beautiful elaborate and delicate wood carved tracery. 

Rev Simon Pitcher, Team Rector of the Sole Bay Team, said:

"The church family at St Edmund's Southwold is really grateful to the National Churches Trust for their recognition and support for the important work that we are doing. The new facilities at St Edmund's will enable the church to offer improved access, better hospitality and a degree of flexibility that have not previously been possible. We hope that the whole community of Southwold, and our many visitors, will enjoy and make use of the church that will now be equipped for the needs of the current century. The National Churches Trust has helped enormously in making our new future possible."

WARWICKSHIRE

RUGBY , St Peter and St John  CV21 3PF

Diocese of Coventry – Church of England - Unlisted  Website   

St Peter and St John’s church receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help build an extension to the church hall to house toilets, reception and meeting room.

The church also receives a £2,000 National Churches Trust Micro-Grant in partnership with the Cinnamon Network micro-grant to help set up a Cinnamon Network recognised social action project to help local people.

The project

The project involves adding an extension to the hall, to accommodate three new toilets. The existing toilets date from 1984 and are inadequate for current use.

The new extension will also house a small reception/meeting room where the church/hall coordinator will be relocated from the vicarage, and where private conversations can take place with people in need of help from services such as Money Advice and a Food Bank. The church will no longer have worn out and inadequate toilet facilities, but more WCs to serve a greater number of people and be better equipped for the elderly and less mobile.

The church

The church started near the railway station when Rugby was an expanding railway engineering town. The current building is a large brick structure built in 1908 by C. Ford Whitcomb. In 1984, after a nearby hall was destroyed by fire, the main church building was split into two to create a community space at the rear, with the main entrance bricked up to create space for a couple of toilets. This last action had an unfortunate impact: many people assume from the bricked up entrance, that the church is closed!

In addition to worship, the church hall [within the church] is used by, mother and  toddlers groups, for community lunches, by a ladies group, "knit and natter", a men's breakfast and for the "Veg Beds" communal garden meeting.

Sheila Bridge, the minister in charge of St Peter and St John’s said:

 "We are delighted to receive these grants from the National Churches Trust, and the Cinnamon Award, towards what we have called 'Project Welcome'.  We hope that this church redevelopment plan will enable our building to better reflect our welcome to everyone and help us to serve our local community more effectively." 


YORKSHIRE

BRADFORD Bowling St Stephen  BD5 7BX

Diocese of Leeds – Church of England – Grade II

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register Website   

Bowling St Stephen, Bradford receives a £34,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to fund urgent repairs to the roofs, masonry, glazing, and underground drainage to the north side of the church.

The project

The project will enable the building to be restored, making use of traditional conservation techniques and materials, to ensure that the historic fabric is sympathetically and appropriately conserved.

The church

St Stephen’s was built to the designs of the architects James Mallinson and Thomas Healy of Bradford, with funding raised from the local community. The foundation stone was laid on the 2 July 1859 and building was completed the following year.

Oak panels were fitted in the chancel in 1921 as a memorial to 279 members of the church and members of the Bradford Pals regiment killed during WWI. They are of national importance.

St Stephen’s is situated at the heart of West Bowling, which is one of the most disadvantaged communities in Britain, ranked in the top 1% of most deprived wards in the country. St Stephen’s delivers a wide range of events to support members of the community, including: a job club, money management course, credit union, health and exercise classes, children’s work, youth work, and meals for the homeless and refugees.

BURNSALL St Wilfrid,  BD23 6BP

Diocese of Leeds – Church of England - Grade I Website

St Wilfrid’s church receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund a project which includes the re-roofing of the north and south side chapels, repointing the east gable above chapel and repairing window SII in the south chapel.

The project

The church suffers badly from damp and water penetration in several areas. The worst affected is the St Wilfrid chapel where buckets are used to catch rainwater. When the building is weathertight the church hopes to carry out a complete internal redecoration, this has been postponed for 10 years. The building is a spectacular space for a small rural church but it now looks shabby.

The church

St Wilfrid’s is an ancient Grade I church situated in a Conservation Area in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. On permanent display are the remains of Anglo-Scandinavian crosses and tomb covers. After the Norman Conquest the church was rebuilt in stone. In the time of Henry VIII, the church was completely reconstructed in the Perpendicular style and the tower added. In 1612 the church was repaired at the cost of Sir William Craven. In 1858/9 the church was ‘restored’ by a local architect John Varley; the Victorian style chancel arch was put in and the nave roof raised by six feet.

A spokesman for the church said:

 “St Wilfrid's PCC is delighted to receive this substantial award from the National Churches Trust. The tenders for the work were all significantly more than envisaged and when the Letter of Intent was issued to the contractor in March there was a funding gap of £47,000. The award from the National Churches Trust is a significant contribution towards closing the gap. The work is progressing well and is on schedule.”

HUDDERSFIELD Holy Trinity HD1 4DT

Diocese of Leeds – Church of England – Grade II*

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register Website  

Holy Trinity church, Huddersfield receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to fund urgent repairs to the nave and aisle roofs and to stonework and rainwater goods.

The project

The church will celebrate its bicentenary in 2019 and the repairs will mean that Holy Trinity will be structurally stable and weathertight on the south side with the roof, rainwater goods and drainage functioning as intended. In addition to completing external repairs, deterioration of the interior plasterwork and decoration will be stopped. Once this is dry, in the medium term the church will be able to redecorate as well to stabilise the monuments inside on the south walls which are currently badly affected by the water.

Once the repairs are completed the building will be able to host a greater number of events such as concerts, meetings of local organisations and community groups. The repairs will also ensure that Holy Trinity continues to play a prominent and elegant part in the townscape of Huddersfield.

The church

Holy Trinity church was built between 1816-19 by Leeds architect Thomas Taylor (1777-1826) with a west tower which is prominent in many views of the town. The exterior of the church is largely unaltered from its construction. 

 HULL

Hull Minster, Kingston upon Hull HU1 1RR

Diocese of York – Church of England– Grade I Website 

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

Hull Minster receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Grant to help fund a project to pay for urgent repairs to clerestory windows including to stonework and associated glazing.

The church also receives a £2,000 National Churches Trust Micro-Grant in partnership with the Cinnamon Network micro-grant to help set up a Cinnamon Network recognised social action project to help local people.

The project

During a recent survey of the roof to investigate water ingress into the nave at Hull Minster it became apparent that a major part was the deteriorating stonework around the clerestory windows and associated glazing.  In recent years volunteers have commented that putting out up to 40 buckets to catch water takes them away from welcoming visitors and the building feels cold and damp. Securing the clerestory windows will reduce the need to put out buckets and help deal with the damp atmosphere.

The work is part of a wider project to transform the building to enable it to welcome more people to use the church and improve worship.

By attracting people to Hull Minster the church aims to be a catalyst for economic regeneration in Hull’s Old Town (situated in the 3rd most deprived local authority in England  - out of 326) which will ultimately create more jobs. Event organisers will have a high quality, medium sized, unique venue to put on events in a central location which has the facilities and flexibility to meet their needs.

The church

Built around 1285, the church’s history encapsulates the story of Hull. Hull Minster was built with the close patronage of Edward I, as he developed Kingston upon Hull, an outstanding example of an Edwardian planned town exhibiting bastide-type features.

With Edward’s royal masons at work, Hull Minster rose in concert with other royal foundations: notably, the London church of the Greyfriars, designed for Edward’s second wife.

In architectural terms this church is of at least national and, in key respects, of international significance. Window traceries at Hull Minster were inspired by Louis IX's Sainte Chapelle in Paris.

Other elements which make Hull Minster unique are; two “arts and crafts” windows designed by the world-renowned Walter Crane, the 6th largest organ in the country built in the 18th century, unique hand carved oak pew ends from medieval and Victorian times, Robert ‘Mousey’ Thompson furniture containing his trademark mice, and a beautifully carved coralloid marble font dating back to around 1380, used by the slave abolitionist William Wilberforce.

Canon Rev Dr Neal Barnes, Vicar of Hull Minster:

 "We are very grateful to the National Churches Trust for this generous grant towards vital repair work on the stonework around the clerestory windows at Hull Minster, ensuring that they are watertight and fit for purpose for many years to come. This is a key part of our on-going £4.5M project to repair, reorder and improve facilities within the Minster to improve worship, safeguard our heritage and enable events that welcome in the whole community. It will help us to conserve what is arguably Hull's most significant historical building for generations to come and allow them to enjoy all that it has to offer."

 

SAND HUTTON St Mary YO41 1LB

Diocese of York – Church of England - Grade II Website

The church is on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register

St Mary’s church, Sand Hutton, receives a £15,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund repairs including the complete re-roofing of the spire in oak shingles and stone repairs to the tower and lower walls.

The project

The repair work to its spire, tower, masonry and rainwater goods is urgently needed to enable St Mary's to remain open for worship. As a result of the project St Mary's will be in much improved condition, structurally more stable and weather tight.

If it is not carried out now there is serious risk that this wonderful historic building will be lost to current and future generations as it will deteriorate,  becoming financially unviable.

The project also aims to provide new facilities (kitchen, toilet, heritage display area) to encourage greater use within the community and the wider area.

The church

St Mary’s is a Grade II listed building located in a Conservation Area, built in 1840 by Salvin, replacing the 12th century church of St Leonard’s, the ruins of which stand behind St Mary’s.

It is in a Gothic style of sandstone construction and contains some fine stained glass windows, several by Kempe.  In a vault in the churchyard is buried Col. Michael Childers, 11th Light Dragoons who died at Sand Hutton in 1854. He fought in the Peninsular War and in the Battle of Waterloo and served 13 years in India. Close beside this vault is the grave of John Acomb who died in 1849. He was a corporal in the 2nd Life Guards and also fought at Waterloo. The “Waterloo Medal” he received is now to be seen in the regimental Museum of the Household Cavalry at Windsor.

Reverend Chris Wingfield, Rector of the Harton Benefice said:

“We are extremely grateful to National Churches Trust for their generous grant towards the essential repair work to St Mary’s church. Without their help, and the gifts of other benefactors, we would not be able to maintain and sustain our beautiful, historic building which is so integral to our faith, worship and community witness.”

 WALES

CEREDIGION  

CWMYSWYTH

St Michael and All Angels  (Eglwys Newydd/Hafod Church) SY25 6DX

Diocese of St Davids – Church in Wales - Grade II*Website  

St Michael and All Angels, Cwmyswyth receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund urgent roof repairs.

The project

The re-roofing will ensure that the church will be structurally secure and weathertight. It will ensure that the church’s valuable heritage, such as the stained and painted glass windows, lead work, and its beautiful limed oak timber roof and furnishings, will be conserved.

The church

Eglwys Newydd Hafod Church is an impressive building with a wealth of history. Thomas Johnes inherited the Hafod Estate in 1790. He built a beautiful mansion and then in 1803 commissioned James Wyatt to design an impressive new Gothic style church with many unusual features, such as the ‘east’ window to face south-west, with sixteenth century Flemish stained glass brought over from the Low Countries.

Tragically, in April 1932 a fire destroyed much of the charming internal fittings and roof. The excellent restoration work was overseen by W D Caroe, who designed the new attractive barrel shaped limed-oak roof and the beautiful furnishings and fittings which feature around some of the original treasures, although damaged they are still to be seen at the church today.

Hafod Church receives thousands of visitors, whether they are seeking their genealogy, interested in the heritage of the area, or walkers walking on the Hafod Estate.

A spokesman for the church said:

 “Members and the local community of Eglwys Newydd/Hafod Church, Cwmystwyth are most grateful for the generous support of the National Churches Trust. This will enable our historical and much loved church, which is situated within the beautiful Cambrian Mountains, to continue its’ services of worship and to welcome the many visitors who appreciate the heritage, both of paramount importance to the wellbeing of the local and wider community.”

 FLINTSHIRE

CAERWYS

St Michael, Caerwys, Flintshire, CH7 5BH

Diocese of St Asaph – Church in Wales - Grade II*Website

St Michael’s receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help fund installing toilets and a kitchen.

The project

Currently the church has no indoor toilet or kitchen facilities. There is a Portaloo in the churchyard and a tap outside the church. The project is to provide toilet and kitchen facilities as part of a re-ordering programme to include improvements to heating, audio-visual and reception facilities, and improvements to the chancel area.

The improvements will increase the use of the building, which will help maintain its condition.

Mother and Toddler and Sunday School Groups will use the church regularly if toilet and kitchen facilities are installed. Concerts, lectures and exhibitions will be more frequent with facilities in place.

The church

St Michael's is the parish church of the village of Caerwys in Flintshire, North East Wales. It has a late 13th Century tower and nave to which a chancel and a north aisle were later added. The church has two lych-gates, one originally dating to the 15th Century. The earliest reference to the church is in 1244 when it was nominated as a meeting place between Prince David and King Henry III and was referred to again in 1284, when compensation was paid to the rector for damage done to the church during Edward I's incursion into Wales.

Ven John Lomas , Rector, and Roland Ward, Churchwarden, said:

“We at St Michael's Church are delighted to have been awarded this generous grant from the National Churches Trust. It will enable us to proceed straight away to provide much-needed kitchen and toilet facilities. They will help us serve worshippers and the community more fully for many years to come.”

DYFED

St Nicholas, St Nicholas,  near Goodwick, Dyfed, SA64 0LG

Diocese of St Davids – Church in Wales -   Grade IIWebsite 

St Nicholas receives a £10,000 National Churches Trust Repair Grant to help fund urgent roof and stonework repairs.

The church also receives a £2,000 National Churches Trust Micro-Grant in partnership with the Cinnamon Network micro-grant to help set up a Cinnamon Network recognised social action project to help local people.

The project

The retention of a local church in good order will always make a great difference to those in rural communities, whether or not they regularly worship there. For many communities, such as St Nicholas, the church is, together with the village hall and a nearby chapel, now the only surviving symbol of the kind of community life that once existed here in the past.

There is no school, no post office, no shop, no public house. The investment in the church, signified by the major repair would, at this time, have a powerful and creative impact on local well-being and confidence. The importance of the simple creation of a safe, dry and warm space in the centre of a community cannot be overstated.

The church

St Nicholas is an attractive mediaeval church, sited at the heart of its village, and close to one of the finest and most visited stretches of the Pembrokeshire coast.

The church lies on the "Saints and Stones" trail followed by many British and overseas visitors to the area each year. Surviving mediaeval elements includes the west wall with its impressive, massive external buttress. The unifying 19th century purple Welsh slate roof is itself now a heritage feature that this project seeks to conserve. The simple layout, modest scale, and overall character of the church represent the quintessential rural Pembrokeshire church.

Mrs Rhian Lloyd, Churchwarden of St Nicholas church said:

“We are simply delighted and thankful to have been awarded such a generous grant from the National Churches Trust. This award will help ensure that St Nicholas church continues to serve as place of worship, and a focal-point for the wider community as well as visitors to our area for generations to come”.

GLAMORGAN

BARRY

All Saints, Barry CF62 6NU

Diocese of Llandaff – Church in Wales - Grade IIWebsite 

All Saints church in Barry receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Repair grant to help fund urgent roof repairs.

The project

The church currently suffers from a roof that not only lets in water when it rains, but also consists of roof tiles that constantly appear to be falling off, rendering the area that surrounds the church unsafe.

All Saints will be transformed into a structurally sound and watertight building able to showcase its heritage to its full potential, as well as becoming a ‘fit for purpose’ fully functioning community building again.

The church

All Saints church was built to meet the needs of the increase in population following the construction of the Barry Docks. The foundation stone was laid on 8 February 1907. The 74 foot tower has 135 steps. A clock and peal of bells, weighing in at 3.4 tons, were installed in 1946 as a war memorial and thanksgiving for peace.

Paul Donovan, Chair of the Roof Restoration Project said:

 “We are most grateful to the National Churches Trust for their generous grant which is supporting us towards our target of £230,000. With this additional grant we are able to commence work on the roof in September 2017 which is due for completion in December 2017. This means that for the majority of the winter season we will be warm and dry and we will be able to concentrate our efforts on serving the community of Barry and beyond as we establish our heritage offer, which is due for completion in May 2018.”

 

SCOTLAND

LINLITHGOW St Peter's Episcopal Church EH49 7EJ

Diocese of Edinburgh – Church of Scotland - Grade B  Website

St Peter’s church receives a £20,000 National Churches Trust Community Grant to help build an extension to the church to house kitchen, toilets and new meeting spaces.

The project

St Peter’s wants to make its building more available to the community as a base for Christian worship and outreach work, a venue for community activities and part of Linlithgow’s historic heritage.

While the main worship area is admirably suited to the needs of the congregation and serves well as a small arts and music venue the ancillary facilities are inaccessible, with very limited capacity. The kitchen is woefully inadequate and does not meet current food hygiene regulations. Users with disabilities cannot access the only toilet without significant physical effort.

These constraints significantly restrict St Peter’s potential as a community resource in the town centre where there is a dearth of small, affordable venues.

The project will add new facilities behind the existing building: accessible entry points and a toilet at church level; a fully-equipped kitchen; a hall suitable for various community uses; a second accessible WC; and a small room suitable for one-to-one meetings.

The church

St Peter’s is located in the Linlithgow Palace and High Street Conservation Area, slightly west of the ruins of Linlithgow Palace. The Byzantine-style building, in the form of a Greek cross surmounted by a semi-glazed dome which illuminates the whole church, sits slightly back from the street immediately opposite Linlithgow loch. The foundation stone was laid in 1927 and the church was consecrated in May 1928. Initially called St Mildred’s in honour of Bishop Walpole’s wife, its name was changed to St Peter’s in 1979.

Revd Christine Barclay said:

 “We at St Peter's are delighted with the support we have received in raising the funds to enable us to realise our vision. We are so very grateful to the National Churches Trust for recognising the value of our project and awarding us such  a generous grant”.