King of Prussia Gold Medal 2016 - Winning Entries

 

The winner of The King of Prussia Gold Medal was announced by the National Churches Trust and the Ecclesiastical Architects and Surveyors Association at a ceremony held at St Mellitus College, London on 3 November 2016.

The King of Prussia Gold Medal for church repair and conservation architecture was won by architects Lloyd Evans Prichard for their work to restore the spire of Sir George Gilbert Scott’s St James church, New Brighton, Merseyside. St James’church received a £500 prize.

Architects Jonathan Rhind were highly commended for their King of Prussia entry for tower and belfry repairs to St Mary’s church, High Bickington, Devon.

At the ceremony, Prince Nicholas von Preussen presented architects Lloyd Evans Prichard with the King of Prussia Gold Medal, the gift of King Frederick William IV of Prussia (1795 – 1861) to the Incorporated Church Building Society in 1857. The award has been made annually since the early 1980s, when the medal was re-discovered during an office move. The medal is held by the winning architect for one year and afterwards a silver replica is provided.

The King of Prussia Gold Medal is awarded on behalf of the Ecclesiastical Architects and Surveyors Association and the National Churches Trust.

Sir George Gilbert Scott

St James’ church was designed by the eminent Victorian architect, Sir George Gilbert Scott in the then fashionable gothic revival style. The church is an imposing building but it stands in a particularly exposed location, just a few hundred metres from Liverpool Bay. Inevitably, weather and time have taken their toll on the structure and, in particular, the magnificent 52 metre high spire.

Architects Lloyd Evans Prichard’s repairs to the spire involved the careful dismantling of the top two thirds of the stone work and rebuilding the spire using lime mortar, and incorporating internal stainless steel bands to brace the masonry structure. The repairs also provided an opportunity to reinstate the lost George Gilbert Scott masonry details, based on careful examination of the original perspective sketch of the church and documentary evidence from historic photographs.

The award is open to the architect or chartered surveyor on any scheme of repair for a church or chapel of any Christian denomination in the UK, in use for regular worship, and over one hundred years old.

The judges said:

“High quality masonry repairs achieved with great accuracy and attention to detail.”

The architects

Lloyd Evans Prichard was founded in Manchester in 1973. Over the last twenty years the practice has established an enviable reputation for competence in the conservation, reuse and re‐ordering of historic buildings and churches which also includes new building where appropriate.

Judges were looking for innovative, high quality church conservation or repair work that has successfully overcome a major aesthetic or technical challenge.

St Mary’s church, High Bickington

Architects Jonathan Rhind were highly commended for their King of Prussia entry for tower and belfry repairs to St Mary’s church, High Bickington, Devon. The work used both traditional and modern repair techniques successfully brought the church building back into use and has ensured that the tower has a long term future.

The judges said:

“Difficult repairs achieved with skill and sensitivity.”

The architects

Jonathan Rhind specialise in historic building conservation and re-use, and new innovative, high-quality projects, often for difficult or controversial sites throughout the southwest of England.